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View Full Version : Uh, yeah, that kind of freaked me out....



G. Hoffman
February 17th, 2011, 02:11 AM
Everybody who makes stuff has some kind of scrap left over. Left over resistors or tubes from old amp projects, tubes and chains from my bike, extra hard drives or memory from computers, etc. If you're resourceful, you'll find uses for some of it.

Around our shop, the most common form of scrap are blocks of mahogany. We buy big 12/4 or 16/4 boards for making necks, and there is always an odd length bit of scrap at the ends. Plus, as careful as we are to make it otherwise, there is always a lot of scrap left over from the making of neck blanks. And we find a lot of uses for this stuff. Sometimes it gets used for structural repairs on guitars, a lot of it gets used as cauls or sanding blocks. I made a bulletin board for a none profit I work with that used a bunch of it to very good effect (if I do say so myself!) About a month ago, I found a piece that was supporting a screw post holding up one of the shops main beams. This was a piece of wood about 2"X16"X24". Just a bit too short for a neck, and so dad just threw it under when he moved the post. It is, however, PERFECT for a one piece electric guitar body!

So, I wanted this piece of wood. I cut a couple 2x6's to support the beam for a few minutes as I retrieved the piece of wood, and I grabbed another - smaller - piece of mahogany to act as a pad for the post. I was getting everything set up, not planning of finishing it because I'm not exactly confident in my abilities at construction, but just getting everything ready so I could have dad check it tomorrow, and we could do it in just a minute or two. Great, easy and all.

Then, as I was putting the 2x6's in place - just so they would be ready to go tomorrow - well, they were apparently a bit longer than needed, because all of a sudden the screw post fell over. Much before I was ready for it. So, OK, really quick, get the 2X6's plumb(ish), pull out the block I'm keeping, set up the screw post again. Except I can't find the pin to hold the two telescoping sections together! And those 2X6's are just being held by gravity, and the are resting on a very poor quality concrete floor!

Don't you know it, I finally found the pin (after about 10 minutes) right next to the pad they the post sits on. The one place I DIDN'T look. Typical. I think it is all back together right now, but I'm leaving the 2X6's in place until someone more competent than I can look at it.

I got my wood, though!

The post (and the 2X6 temporary support):

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5053/5451768403_a8d498e0b4.jpg



My new guitar (eventually):

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4081/5452382638_5b373f1cb8.jpg



I'm still half convinced the building is going to fall down on my head while I'm sanding in there! I am not a construction kind of guy!


Gabriel

G cubed
February 17th, 2011, 02:43 AM
Is there any way you can put that lolly column on the floor and still support the beam it was meant to? Drill a couple holes in the floor and use some lead sinks to bolt it down so it stays in place. Is the beam it's holding up an I beam or a wood header? Either way, secure the other end of the column to it. Good Luck.:Thumbsup:

G. Hoffman
February 17th, 2011, 03:19 AM
Is there any way you can put that lolly column on the floor and still support the beam it was meant to? Drill a couple holes in the floor and use some lead sinks to bolt it down so it stays in place. Is the beam it's holding up an I beam or a wood header? Either way, secure the other end of the column to it. Good Luck.:Thumbsup:



Just a big (about 12") square wood beam. It's an old building. I'm probably going to bold the post to the beam, but it spent the last decade or so just being supported by gravity, so its probably OK. Dad came back and looked, and thought it was fine.


And, on the other hand, when you end up with this:


http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5294/5452554608_5227d593e7.jpg


...it all seems a bit more enjoyable. This is going to make a nice guitar! Its got a little checking on one end, but that's to be expected, and there is plenty of clear length left.


Gabriel