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Knastratt
April 17th, 2011, 07:09 PM
Hi fellow wombionions!

I'm trying to pitch my music to different projects via taximusic.com. I pitched this one for a luxury car advert. The reason it wasn't chosen was because it was "too delicate". In this context I have no idea what the reason was.

Would someone please elaborate on the critic in question in context of the sync? I know that the subjective opinion counts, but maybe I'm missing something crucial?

Here is the link.

Car sync (http://www.mixerized.com/music/sync/Car_sync.mp3)

2011 mixerized.com all rights reserved

Shoot!

I just wanna have a clue what "too delicate" might mean.

Knastratt
April 17th, 2011, 07:57 PM
It's okay to tell that it sucks as well. I just need to comprehend.

Barish
April 17th, 2011, 07:59 PM
Don't try to make sense of the language the advertising people use too much.

I had been asked to make the music a bit more "pink"...

How the fuck do you make a piece of music more pink?

Just copy that work on your archive and move on.

They simply mean they didn't like your tune, but they don't want to kill your will to go on. Hence the word, "delicate".

B.

By the way, if you didn't go into that flutey Shadowsish-Mark Knopflerish theme after that tense intro, probably that would have been it. In jingles, you have 30 seconds to tell your story, and you have to tell a story. Find a hook and throw it into the audiences' minds like an anchor. It's much harder than making a 3-minute hit song. By the time you arse around with intros and warm up melody lines, your time is up. Anyway, you live you learn.

Knastratt
April 17th, 2011, 08:03 PM
Great! I get it! :Wink:

Aardvark
April 17th, 2011, 11:40 PM
I just wanna have a clue what "too delicate" might mean.

A bit light in the loafers I suspect.

NTTAWWT! (See: New York Rangers)

:Coolio:


Barish nailed it.

Pretty good for a Turk!:Wink:



Cheers,
Aardvark



.

PRobb
April 18th, 2011, 01:01 AM
You talk about English language skills in the context of what some ad guy said?:headpalm:

dwoz
April 18th, 2011, 04:21 AM
wait...that thing is 2:00 !!!!!!

Anyway...it has been in the forefront of my attention lately that the music used for advertising these days seems to have all been pulled from the same royalty-free library, and it's all universally bad, bad, bad.

If you want to get your bit played on commercials these days, apparently you have to write a vapid non-melody that's played over I-IV-I-IV-I-IV in as innocuous a manner as possible, probably to let the VO guy read his utterly insipid script, in a way that prevents the viewer from noticing that the ad concept is utterly devoid of concept, that it's just a little slice of some kind of pablumic generic dross that they can smear a product placement and logo into.

Goes211
April 18th, 2011, 06:31 AM
I'll play client for a second :

"It's too real. That's a flute and a guitar, and I want abstract. I want textures. Too many happy chords. Where is the tension?
It's too long, needs to start faster. Make a bold statement!"

2010 BMW Commercial (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOaQ9_O6NCI&feature=related)
(listen for the jingle at the very end. I mean the "Klang, Klang". They wet themselves over that).

Remember in Europe the format is 30 seconds, anything above that is for the web. As Barish said, you weren't that far off. Get rid of the flute and guitar and push up the rest of the noise.
Oh, and do not AT ANY MOMENT seek any artistic recognition when doing this kind of work. It's money, period.
:Coolio:

Tim Halligan
April 18th, 2011, 06:40 AM
+1 to every word Goes said.

Don't think "jingle" or "music" per se....


Think "sound design".


Cheers,
Tim

PS. In recent years, jingle houses down here have taken to calling themselves sound designers...which kinda smacks of rubbish/garbage collectors calling themselves "sanitation engineers", or roadies calling themselves "equipment relocation engineers".

Barish
April 18th, 2011, 06:40 AM
wait...that thing is 2:00 !!!!!!

Anyway...it has been in the forefront of my attention lately that the music used for advertising these days seems to have all been pulled from the same royalty-free library, and it's all universally bad, bad, bad.

I think that's quite normal and understandable.

The advert guy has no musical ear. Knows fuck all about music. So he's not in a position to distinguish any difference.

And the royalty-free music is cheaper.

So we know what the decision is going to be.

I don't blame the advert guy for not having the musical ear, because he's just not given it. What can he do?

I actually blame that sucker who's been given that gift, yet selling it for peanuts to bring down a profession millions of fellows are making a living along with him on its knees, and to eventually kill it.


If you want to get your bit played on commercials these days, apparently you have to write a vapid non-melody that's played over I-IV-I-IV-I-IV in as innocuous a manner as possible, probably to let the VO guy read his utterly insipid script, in a way that prevents the viewer from noticing that the ad concept is utterly devoid of concept, that it's just a little slice of some kind of pablumic generic dross that they can smear a product placement and logo into.

I don't know what's going on in the US, but over here in Turkey, I can categorically say that the stuff I hear in commercials is of a higher quality in every way than what I hear on the pop charts. They come up with some cracking music for those ads, I tell you. And some of them are my friends, and are amazing musicians whom chucked their touring careers in for that stuff.

B.

Knastratt
April 18th, 2011, 08:37 AM
You talk about English language skills in the context of what some ad guy said?:headpalm:

:lol:

G cubed
April 18th, 2011, 11:02 AM
I'm sure it helps to have a storyboard and copy of what the vo is in order to know the direction the producer is heading. Is it a video ad, radio ad, or both? Do they have a rough or final cut of the video that you can use to compose to? I'd say these are factors that if you understand them, will make the process that much easier.

.....oh, and as was stated, don't pay much attention to the colorful words they use to critic your work. Just remember you heard that from a former petroleum products transfer technician who began that illustrious career at the age of 16.

(ya, I pumped gas) :lol:

Knastratt
April 18th, 2011, 05:03 PM
I'm sure it helps to have a storyboard and copy of what the vo is in order to know the direction the producer is heading. Is it a video ad, radio ad, or both? Do they have a rough or final cut of the video that you can use to compose to? I'd say these are factors that if you understand them, will make the process that much easier.

.....oh, and as was stated, don't pay much attention to the colorful words they use to critic your work. Just remember you heard that from a former petroleum products transfer technician who began that illustrious career at the age of 16.

(ya, I pumped gas) :lol:

The description had a few cue points at 20 sec, 54 sec and the snippet was supposed to be exactly 2 minutes long.

I'll do it more pink next time. :beer:

Problem with taxi is that it is only a written description and rarely something to look at.

Knastratt
April 18th, 2011, 05:08 PM
I think that's quite normal and understandable.

The advert guy has no musical ear. Knows fuck all about music. So he's not in a position to distinguish any difference.

And the royalty-free music is cheaper.

So we know what the decision is going to be.

I don't blame the advert guy for not having the musical ear, because he's just not given it. What can he do?

I actually blame that sucker who's been given that gift, yet selling it for peanuts to bring down a profession millions of fellows are making a living along with him on its knees, and to eventually kill it.



I don't know what's going on in the US, but over here in Turkey, I can categorically say that the stuff I hear in commercials is of a higher quality in every way than what I hear on the pop charts. They come up with some cracking music for those ads, I tell you. And some of them are my friends, and are amazing musicians whom chucked their touring careers in for that stuff.

B.

Thanks for the insight!

Be well - Pär

TubaSolo
April 18th, 2011, 08:03 PM
Unless the agency specifically said "this campaign's target is women over 50", for a car like that the ole "secret agent on a mission" vibe is always a good start (listen to stuff like the Bourne trilogy score to put you in the mood). In this case the "too delicate" comment sums it up adequately I think.

Goes did you make that track (for BMW)? :Thumbsup:

Brendo
April 19th, 2011, 12:37 PM
the music just kind of says to me "boy is this car aesthetically inoffensive" - it's sort of too gentle and too "nowherey".

radiationroom
April 19th, 2011, 01:38 PM
It's okay to tell that it sucks as well. I just need to comprehend.

Tooffally dude'man yo'nglich iz bedda den moef umircianz's. Don'wurra'bout it!

:grin: :Coolio: :vuvu: :Thumbsup: :beer:

radiationroom
April 19th, 2011, 01:43 PM
Problem with taxi is that it is only a written description and rarely something to look at.

Yah. And there are some who question whether or not it is a legitimate business.

An old client of mine is friends with Taxi's founder Michael Laskow and introduced me to him at a Philadelphia Songwriter's Association meeting back in 1998. Laskow seems like a straight shooter and is a hell of a polite guy. FWIW YMMV

Knastratt
April 19th, 2011, 04:13 PM
Yah. And there are some who question whether or not it is a legitimate business.

An old client of mine is friends with Taxi's founder Michael Laskow and introduced me to him at a Philadelphia Songwriter's Association meeting back in 1998. Laskow seems like a straight shooter and is a hell of a polite guy. FWIW YMMV

There's nothing wrong with the service per se. It's nice to get opinions as well.