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View Full Version : Glen Campbell has Alzheimer's, plans for final album and farewell tour


radiationroom
June 25th, 2011, 03:15 AM
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/music_blog/2011/06/glen-campbell-alzheimers-ghost-canvas.html

dwoz
June 25th, 2011, 03:23 AM
Glen Campbell is one of the great songwriters.

eagan
June 25th, 2011, 04:28 AM
That's terribly sad.

Not so much that he's getting ready to call it a day. I mean, he's 75. He's had a great career and a good long run, and to wrap it up and take it easy at that age is cool.

No, what hits me as awful and sad is that in the last stretch of his life, when he ought to be able to reflect happily on that decades long successful run, and just pick up a guitar now and then and maybe get together with friends for a jam now and then just for fun, it may be starting to just evaporate and leave him bit by bit.

I wish and hope that it all stays together for him in his mind enough that he can still enjoy it, past reflections and a little current fun, even if it's bad enough that he can't keep it together to function professionally.


JLE

Fulcrum
June 25th, 2011, 05:17 AM
"And I need you more than want you, and I want you for all time."

Jimmy Webb may have written that amazing lyric, but the voice I will always hear singing it is Glen Campbell's.

G cubed
June 25th, 2011, 11:34 AM
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Quite a dynamic duo

jerryskid
June 25th, 2011, 11:45 AM
Glen Campbell is one of the great songwriters.

Dwoz, I really hate to call you on this, but I can't think of any songs written by Glen Campbell. A great guitarist? Hell yeah. He was a member of the Wrecking Crew. Singer? ABSOLUTELY...he was an interpreter of many great tunes, most by Jimmy Webb....Yes he wrote a few songs, but most were just album filler....Please do not take this as lack of respect, because Glen Campbell is one of the KINGS......:Coolio:

RJ Palmer
June 25th, 2011, 11:55 AM
That's terribly sad.

Not so much that he's getting ready to call it a day. I mean, he's 75. He's had a great career and a good long run, and to wrap it up and take it easy at that age is cool.

No, what hits me as awful and sad is that in the last stretch of his life, when he ought to be able to reflect happily on that decades long successful run, and just pick up a guitar now and then and maybe get together with friends for a jam now and then just for fun, it may be starting to just evaporate and leave him bit by bit.

I wish and hope that it all stays together for him in his mind enough that he can still enjoy it, past reflections and a little current fun, even if it's bad enough that he can't keep it together to function professionally.


JLE

Been a fan since I can remember. This is sad news.

My grandmother's downward curve lasted ten years, until her physical illnesses caught up with the alzheimer's and she died about two months after my aunt finally managed to place her in a care home that would look after her properly, after years of taking care of her full time. It was grim. It took two or three years for her to not recognise me or my brother and by the end she didn't know her own children either.
The worst times were the days when she knew her mind was slipping away, that she couldn't remember anything. By the end she was quieter and more peaceful, but she wasn't there anymore.

Johnny
June 25th, 2011, 03:07 PM
It's sad, but what a mature way to handle an impending terminal illness: to go out and say goodbye to everyone, to give to them what you're still able to give.

TheNetStudio
June 25th, 2011, 07:04 PM
"And I need you more than want you, and I want you for all time."

Jimmy Webb may have written that amazing lyric, but the voice I will always hear singing it is Glen Campbell's.

Still one of the most eloquent lyrics ever penned.

I think Mr. Campbell is one of the greatest artists of all time. We are fortunate to have his tremendous talent recorded for posterity.

TheNetStudio
June 25th, 2011, 07:13 PM
I wish and hope that it all stays together for him in his mind enough that he can still enjoy it, past reflections and a little current fun, even if it's bad enough that he can't keep it together to function professionally.


JLE

I think that is really insightful.

As a player, some of my most enjoyable music experiences are not based on memory, but just playing, and letting the music be. I don't know how this will affect him, but he clearly is a musician that feels the music rather than just playing it.

I always say some people "do" and some people "are". He falls into the latter. My hope for him is that music will always be something that brings him joy, and something he will always be.

Fulcrum
June 25th, 2011, 08:14 PM
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Tim Armstrong
June 26th, 2011, 06:35 AM
My favorite two YouTube videos featuring Glen:

This was a song that Brian Wilson wrote for Glen after Glen bailed out the Beach Boys by standing in for Brian after his panic attack forced him off the road. Guess it wasn't a national hit, but not for any lack of a push (he did it on at least two of the big dance shows):

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And here is a very cool version of "Wichita Lineman" he did with Stone Temple Pilots just a few years ago:

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Tim

Smileyblue
June 26th, 2011, 09:57 PM
"Witchia Lineman" and "Rhinestone Cowboy" were two songs my dad played in the car when I was a kid, and I have never forgotten them. He has an amazing voice.

I saw the remake of True Grit the other day and really enjoyed it. Matt Damon did a great job playing Campbell's character, but I will never forget the original with John Wayne. What a film

Tone Laborer
June 28th, 2011, 10:50 PM
It's also worth mentioning "Galveston" a beautifully understated protest song, and the poetic, flowing masterpiece, "Gentle on My Mind". Two more Webb songs Campbell took to the top.

The guy's beginnings from wiki, interesting stuff:


In 1958, Campbell moved to Los Angeles to become a session musician. He was part of the 1959 line-up of the group the Champs, famous for their instrumental "Tequila". Campbell was in great demand as a session musician in the 1960s. He was part of the studio musicians clique known as "the Wrecking Crew", many of whom went from session to session together as the same group. In addition to Campbell, Hal Blaine on drums, Tommy Tedesco on guitar, Leon Russell on piano, Carol Kaye on bass guitar, Al Casey on guitar were part of this group of session musicians that defined many pop and rock recordings of the era. They were also heard on Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound" recordings in the early 1960s.

CloseToTheEdge
June 29th, 2011, 05:39 AM
It's sad, but what a mature way to handle an impending terminal illness: to go out and say goodbye to everyone, to give to them what you're still able to give.

Yes. Totally agree. Class.

Les Ismore
June 30th, 2011, 09:44 PM
It's also worth mentioning "Galveston" a beautifully understated protest song, and the poetic, flowing masterpiece, "Gentle on My Mind". Two more Webb songs Campbell took to the top.



Actually "Gentle on my Mind" is a John Hartford song, and John was the banjo player on Glen's tv show. He's the guy in the video up the thread a ways. John was a brilliant songwriter and did one of my all time favorite albums with Vassar Clements, Norman Blake, and others called "Areoplane".

Jimmy Webb is truly a brilliant songwriter, but credit where credit is due.