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View Full Version : A story for the youngens......(bring snacks, it's long)


David Aurora
March 30th, 2007, 04:38 AM
Ok, I'm in a mood of reflection, and I've seen more and more posts recently of young dudes trying to build studios, so I'm gonna tell a story that hopefully is educational.

I'm David Aurora, and I'm a low budget studio owner :Cry:

I am 3 months and 2 weeks shy of my 23rd birthday, there is more grey hair on my head than I'm happy about, I have $10 and I'm sitting in a studio worth about $300,000. Once in a while, I get 3AM calls from the alarm monitoring company, climb out of bed, grab my baseball bat and go check it out (so far it's been little critters thankfully). Every now and then I fight rising water flooding my studio. Gear often blows up and in good times I get it fixed, in bad times I either learn how to fix it REAL fast or I go without.

That shit aint on the Mbox ads is it?

So here I am, about to close. I've been here many times before, but always out of desparation and under a lot of stress. This time it's different. I'm taking a year off to be a normal young cockhead. I'll still do some recording but not in my own studio. Until next year, when I'm building a new studio that has already been in the planning stages for quite some time. I have 6 weeks left here but if I could I'd close right fucking now and start my hair colour recovery early.



Hmmm....how should I form this tutorial......?......I think I'll just spew thoughts and see if they need further explanation.

Building a studio with a budget lower than Tom Misner's (Or how I learned to stop eating and love loud noise

OK. So how the fuck am I 22 years old with a scary amount of money around me (we'll get to why I'm still broke later). It works like this.....school was never for me. Well, when I was REALLY little I was right into it, but after my parents split when I was 10 I just totally lost it for a while. But anyways, I saw school as a MASSIVE waste of time.....UNLESS YOU THINK YOU MIGHT EVER, POSSIBLY, MAYBE WANT TO FOLLOW A CAREER THAT REQUIRES HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES! Thankfully, that's not me. But don't leave school if you think you might change your mind when you burn out.

Anyways, I hated school, and I've always been raised to not fear work. When I was 14 I had given up competitive swimming after a broken foot and taken up rocking like a motherfucker. I traded my budgie smugglers for a job at the pool after school and weekends. I think my first paycheck bought a guitar lead but I'm not positive. I worked there for a year or so, then got a job at a Timezone (a video arcade thingy). I would've been in grade...10 I think?? Something like that. At this point I had an 8 track recorder and a couple mics and was recording mates whenever the chance was there. I had really gotten into the whole recording thing, it wasn't just fun, it made sense to me. I thought maybe I could make a career out of it but didn't know how. As cool as the 8 track was, we used to drool over pictures of real studios, but there was NO FUCKING WAY we could afford to go to one. Now this is only 8 years ago or so, but you would not believe how much prices have changed round here since then. Any high school kids can record these days. We were tight as fuck too, well rehearsed and polished but with only dreams of recording.

At some point a mate did a recording course with some fuckwit out in the bush. He asked my band to go record there for his assessment. We were stoked. We went there, had THE WORST recording experience I've ever had, and left bitter and disappointed. The guy in charge was a total cunt, our music got hacked to pieces in Pro Tools (Version 3 I guess? I remember we recorded to ADAT originally, then when we left they transferred to Pro Tools) and we got nothing out of it but frustration.

As some of you know by now, I can have a short fuse.

"Fuck this bullshit!!! It's fucking cheaper for me to become an engineer than to fucking hire one, and then I can record without being treated like shit. Fuck it, fuck him, fuck school, I'm gonna build a fucking studio where young bands can record without getting ripped off or treated like nothing."

Now that's a big fucking call for a kid when a fucking ADAT tape cost near what a fucking hard drive costs now.

Long and boring story later, I finished grade 10, left school and increased my hours at work. Enrolled at SAE (yep, HUGE waste of money, don't bother.....I was young and stupid.....I'll come back to this actually....), left home, changed jobs. I was studying full time at SAE, working when I wasn't there, and doing all the recording I could possibly do. Now...

The first 3 months of SAE were fucking great. "Basic sound principles" they called it. Speed of sound, frequencies, decibels, mics, recording devices, history of recording etc..... All EXTREMELY valuable and NECESSARY information.

After 3 months, we had lessons such as "how to boot a computer" (a whole fucking lesson) etc, so I stopped going. I DID get my certificate and passed all the tests, I just didn't attend classes. Instead, I practiced my ass off trying to get good sounds and learning how to use gear.

Through the year I bought my first Pro Tools rig (I mentioned I was young and stupid right???). Version 4.something. Used, from a guy 3 hours away who told me it was the real deal. I'd never used Pro Tools, but he played me some drum tracks from it, and I saw an 882/20 i/o so I believed him and bought the system (Powermac 8500 haha).

Well, this was the first time I got stung in this industry. It was a Pro Tools Project system. A fucking 8 track, not the d24 he claimed it was. Well, technically the project pci card was a rebadged d24 but thats a whole other story and one I didn't know at the time.

The fucking asshole.

Oh well, I had SOMETHING. Even though I already had a fucking 8 track. But at least this was a step up from mixing down to my cassette deck. Now I had the power of CDR, at 4x no less. On a Sony SCSI drive, ahh those were the days.

So anyways, as time went on I started trying to figure out a way of upgrading. I spent ages trying to track down a way, and after about 10 non-returned phone calls to Digidesign Australia I finally got to speak to someone about the upgrade paths they advertised in brochures. They took my details, we discussed systems and money, and the guy said he'd get back to me the next day. 2 more weeks of calling later, I got to speak to the fuckwit again and got the response I WASN'T looking for. "Sorry, we can't offer you anything. The upgrades are America only, blah blah blah.....but you can buy a 24 system for $XXXXXX...." (I don't even remember the number now, but I couldn't afford it). So after maybe a month of Digidesign telling me I could trade up my card and some cash and have an ACTUAL system, I got the shaft.

Fuck.

Anyway, about 6 months later I got a massive loan and bought some gear. The online places and audio rags I read were unanimous. "Buy 1 great mic, 1 great pre, great converters.....". Ghey. I didn't want to record bird calls, I wanted to record bands. So I went a different route, and bought as many decent mics as I could, a desk, heaps of headphones, etc.

This made my shit cooler than the other guys around because I could actually run enough mics to record drums unlike the other douches. i could put mics all round the room I was working in (at my fathers house down the road, though he's a cockhead and I later moved my shit to a spare room at Mum's. My own house was too dodgy.) and have enough channels.

Are you getting these lessons so far? Bands don't care about S/N ratios and audio schools, they want to know if you know how to record THEIR instruments and they want enough equipment to do it comfortably.

So at this point I'm 17, with a massive debt, a decent knowledge of how sound and sound equipment of all sorts works, a pile of gear, and a couple years of experience recording bands already. Aside from the headaches of the money, not a bad place to be.

My second shafting. Working on a big project without a contract. Long story, but this job would have paid a huge chunk of my gear off. They didn't pay, I'd trusted them enough to hand over a master. After 6 months I managed to get $250 out of the thousands they owed, and I've never recieved any more. Round the same time I was also recording a lot of bands for experience. Mistake- I already HAD experience, just not the confidence to ask for money. Sure, my recordings weren't exactly the "black" album, but they were still good enough to charge for.

Did you catch those lessons? Even when it's fun, this is still a fucking job. If you're working, charge. The philosophy of "making a name for yourself" by working free/cheap is incredibly dumb and it doesn't work. Nor does it help with customer loyalty. You get your name by your sound quality and how you interact with the band. Buy good coffee when you're recording. Offer them a ride when they go to call a taxi. Help them fine tune their sound if they're unsure. THESE things make a reputation.

So, I hit 18 and the oppurtunity arises to buy a factory. $60,000. Lot of fucking money, especially at that age. I hesitated, stressed, paced the house and ultimately went for it. Smart move. Property is a wise investment. If your studio goes under, you can sell and walk away debt free. What you make on appreciation WILL go a long way towards paying off gear etc. And that doesn't suck. My place has gone up to over quadruple what it cost. Not bad. And now, I'm in a position to go "fuck it, I'll rent it out for a year, sell it, buy a factory in a cheaper position (where I am is WAY overpriced) and build a new place".

If you want security, take precautions. Sure the big boys have a steady flow of work that buys SSL's and shit. Most of us don't though. Think carefully about the future of your studio so you have a way out other than a noose if things get really bad. Be cautious. I've seen guys go "well, I can charge $25 an hour. I can work 12 hours a day, 6 days a week. Wow, that's $1800 a week. I can get a 2 year lease on this place for $1200 a month and pay it EASY". Well, yeah, if you get the 72 hours of work per week you project. And hey, once in a while you do. But what the fuck are you planning on doing when your DAW shits the bed in July and you had NO WORK in June? I've seen this too many times

So be realistic and smart. If you're gonna build a studio, think about the property aspect. If the studio dies, can you pay the rent? Can you buy, is it a good idea? If you're investing with others, can you be sure they won't bail, or take over? Don't add up all the hours in the day as income. Check around, how much work is in your area? How much competition? Do people know you? Do people like you?

OK, so I'm 18 and I learn the hard way how to build a studio. I got some things right (room sound of live room), I got some things wrong (WAY too much mechanical transmission through the place....hey, guy who was asking about building a studio next to the wannabe korn band in the womb university....are you listening here?). But overall I did pretty fucking well with building the place.

Why? How did an 18 year old know how not to fuck it up on his first (actual purpose built) studio?

Planning and research. Whether it's in a proper facility like what I was doing or in a garage, the common mistake is "oh, Uncle Cletus said egg cartons soundproof well"....."fuck, we just ate 3 tonnes of eggs and these cartons aren't doing shit.....but I remember hearing that mattresses will do it.....help me grab all the beds in the house....". Plan it- what do you want it to sound/feel/look like? Research it. How do shapes or surface materials affect the sound of rooms? How does ceiling height affect things? How do you calculate things like what size absorbers you need for certain frequencies? How do you soundproof rooms? Then back to planning- how are you gonna put all this info together? What is your budget? What is your time frame? If you build it.....will they come???

OK, next up.....prepare yourself for hell. Sure, it's fun for a few months. You have a studio, that's fucking cool. You probably have a little burst of work that you expect will stay like that forever. Think again. In about 6 months, you start seeing reality. Is your advertising working? How are your neighbours? How is the gear holding up? Is that a rattle form the light fittings in the booth? Fuck, there's been robberies in the area.

Yep, all this shit is YOUR problem. Remember when you went to Crazy Chuck's Crack-den Studio and were wondering why he was watching you round the mics? Now you have a band in with a notorious theiving bass player and you can't afford to lose a single thing right now.

REALITY!!!! ahhh....ghey.

The "this is awesome, I've been playing loud since 3pm yesterday and now it's 9am today" becomes "oh for fucks sake, I haven't slept in 3 days now, this fucking hum won't get out of the system and I've got an important session in 30 minutes".

Yeah, it's cool a lot of the time too. But it's not the good times that break people, you don't need to prepare for good times.

So here I am, 22 and I've been making records for a living since I was 16, for fun since I was even younger. Throughout the running of this studio I've had more fun than you can possibly imagine, but as I said it's not the good times you need to prepare for so here's my not-so-fun bits:
- As far as I'm aware, I'm the only studio in the area not to go bust. And the only one to close by choice, with the plan of building an even better place.
- Not completely due to the studio, but massively pushed by it I spent the end of my teens/start of my 20's (ya know....the fun part of your life) with EXTREME depression and stressing my fucking ass off.
- Realised a lot of muso friends are total users who are just hanging round for the freebies.
- Almost lost it all a few times.
- Been ripped off by customers and companies I'm a customer of.
- Seen some people sink really fucking low. We all know how emotional music is. I've seen great players and friends gutted by addictions, people on the brink of suicide over music, people just totally fucking break down and lose it...etc.
- Due to investing in gear, I'm pretty good with assets, but so fucking low on cash usually that I can't even go to a doctor when I need to half the time.
- Heaps of shit actually.

So there you go. Read this shit before you build a studio or consider audio as a career. Don't think this shit won't happen to you. Weigh it up, are you willing to go through all this shit so you can record bands? I am, that's why I've kept doing it, and will keep doing it both freelance and from my new studio next year. But I've seen others crumble and it's a sad fucking thing to watch.

But, this is gonna be a great break :D I close, I buy a BMX, I ride a lot, I play way more gigs, I get a part time day job and blow it all on new gear for a year, then I return to running a studio with this knowledge and black hair and no bags under my eyes and lots of shiny new gear. This fucking rules

jerryskid
March 30th, 2007, 05:02 AM
Great Fucking advice, david......and a fine read......you're much older than your years......I don't know if that's good or not....:grin:

CaptainHook
March 30th, 2007, 05:06 AM
you're much older than your years......I don't know if that's good or not....:grin:

What sucks is when you go from being older than your years,
to just OLD. :lol: :Sad:

Nice post.

Best of luck with everything.

lebouche
March 30th, 2007, 06:27 AM
Great read and Advice David.
I bought property when I was 20. I had a managerial title and managed to get a bank to lend me. 5 Years later I had doubled my money and it was party time. This went a long way cash wise towards setting up my studio although I don't have much gear we all know that just keeping a place running or in cables can cost a fortune. Plus I ate what I wanted went where I wanted stayed where I wanted hotel wise and took taxis when I wanted. These things I still do apart from the going where I want and the hotel bit although I am broke quite often I always spend more than I earn. It keeps me working hard.
Sounds like you are going to enjoy your year off!:Thumbsup:

blackieC
March 30th, 2007, 06:45 AM
I still can't get past the part where he titles it, "a story for the youngens" shortly before revealing that he is almost twenty three.

I have been thirty eight for all of about three hours and I'm still learning these lessons.

Good post/warning David.

David Aurora
March 30th, 2007, 06:46 AM
I still can't get past the part where he titles it, "a story for the youngens" shortly before revealing that he is almost twenty three.

I have been thirty eight for all of about three hours and I'm still learning these lessons.

Good post/warning David.

happy birthday then dude!!

haha yeah its a wierd paradox.....i know im young but im so fucking worn out i feel about 80!

MacGregor
March 30th, 2007, 08:20 AM
Greenies for you, David, that's fucking good advice.

If someone for the administration stuff is reading: make it a sticky
in the University forum, it's a 'must-read' for newbies.
Can save lives.

Mac

Tim Halligan
March 30th, 2007, 09:29 AM
Brilliant.

It ALL rings true...actually some of it is a little close to the bone... :Confused:

That old saying "If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning" is so true.

...and this story is both...

...in the best possible way.

:D


Cheers,
Tim

David Aurora
March 30th, 2007, 11:50 AM
cool, i was worried it was just me for a second :lol:

haha but seriously, i hope it helps show reality to noobs. i didnt write it to put them off, i wrote it to show what the glossy shit doesnt show. if it puts you off, you wont last in this business, and if it doesn't put you off youre probably grounded enough to go the distance and what i typed should hopefully give you a couple tips

dikledoux
March 30th, 2007, 01:18 PM
That shit aint on the Mbox ads is it?
I was just having this conversation with a friend of mine. "I been doing this shit for better than 20 years!" I said, all of a sudden realizing it myself...

You've been doing it for better than 20 years, but in the space of about 8! And the takeaway is - you still like it. Can't stop. Got some plans to do more of it and stick your neck out even further.

Enjoy the break. Enjoy the return.

dik

Azraphael
March 30th, 2007, 01:41 PM
Excellent post, David!

...and, interestingly enough, very timely for me, as someone who's decided to take that path.

Am I certifiable for finding your story inspiring, rather than discouraging? I see in it someone that has the same passion that I do, who against the odds, has made it work. And will take some time off and come back to make it work... and be even better, I'd wager.

I think I'm gonna cry. :)

Thanks for sharing. I truly appreciate it.

Cheers,

Dave

omikl
March 30th, 2007, 02:06 PM
The "It ain't in the mbox ads" line echoes my own comment, made sometime in '82 whilie hauling a Marshall 4x12 up a steep staircase at 2am after a gig: "Bert Weedon[1] said fuck-all about this" ;)

1) Bert Weedon was a "guitar star" in the UK during the late 50's and produced a tutor book called "Play in a day". Every Brit player of a certain age will have used it at some point.

David Aurora
March 30th, 2007, 02:22 PM
Excellent post, David!

...and, interestingly enough, very timely for me, as someone who's decided to take that path.

Am I certifiable for finding your story inspiring, rather than discouraging? I see in it someone that has the same passion that I do, who against the odds, has made it work. And will take some time off and come back to make it work... and be even better, I'd wager.

I think I'm gonna cry. :)

Thanks for sharing. I truly appreciate it.

Cheers,

Dave

ya know the strangest thing happened tonight. a man i looked up to round the time of starting this place, a role model who at times was like a father to me (the father of my old bandmates actually), who i havent seen for years, came into the studio. sheer chance. his daughter is getting into film and wanted to use a track on my myspace for a video project. i told her to drop by and id burn her a copy and by chance her dad brought her down (i figured she'd drive herself).

this was the guy who taught me (by example) that you cant bitch out when things get tough. hes told me about his life stacks of times, though not for years, and hes a prime example. hes had businesses go under, BIG businesses, hes had shocking times personally and great times, i mean this is a guy who doesnt wrap himself up in cotton wool in fear of the world. he tackles it. he rides the highs, gets his ass beaten in the lows, dusts himself off with a laugh and goes "fuck me, that was wild. im gonna do it again!". all the while being a friendly, caring dude whos always willing to share his wisdom to those who want it, but never forces his opinions. oh, and the first time i ever got drunk, it was his shout!

and i was almost avoiding telling him i was closing cause i thought he might mistakenly get the impression i was giving up. but i told him, and he listened patiently as i told him why and how and what i had planned for the future. and he thought it was a good idea. and for probably the first time in this game i felt successful. if i made a good decision according to him, ive learned how to make good decisions. and it became clear that ive proven myself to him as a man who will keep on going no matter how hard shit gets. and fuck, to get the blessing of a man like him means a lot. im lost for words, but yeah, this guy was damn near the closest thing to a father ive ever known

anyway, i had a point.....

ahh yes. thats fucking spectacular that youre not discouraged dude. that was one of the points of my discussion with the guy i mentioned tonight. fuck discouragement. it doesnt get you anywhere. you decide what you want, you figure out how to get it without being a cunt, you pack a fucking lunch at get on with it. i know it sounds like anthony robbins shit but its fucking true, its just a lot of people talk this talk without walking it and it ends up sounding cheesy. rock on dude, i hope it goes fucking awesome for you


p.s. in case i havent made it abundantly clear in the last few years on these boards.....guess whos NOT using protools in his new studio......:D

Fulcrum
March 30th, 2007, 02:26 PM
Am I certifiable for finding your story inspiring, rather than discouraging?

No. No, you're not.

Unless we are both certifiable.

I think I'm gonna cry. :)

We'll never let you hear the end of it if we catch you at it. :lol:

Thanks for sharing. I truly appreciate it.

Nothing to add to that except, "me too".

chrisj
March 30th, 2007, 03:14 PM
David, you rule and I'm proud to even know you, dude.

Some of you know I'm in a fairly untidy divorce. Basically, I devoted three years of my life to someone who's been hurt a LOT and she ended up walking out on me- either honestly believing I was inevitably going to hurt her real bad too, or just because there were too many people in this area (including the father of her kid, a musician and still a good friend of mine) who had the power to tell her things she didn't want to hear.

Quick precis, and I'm leaving a lot out on purpose.

The reason I'm going to save David's post, and possibly print it out and staple it to my fucking forehead, is because she DID walk out, and is having kid's father remove pretty much all the furniture in the house leaving it echoing and bare- but she's leaving me the house, even though she's trying to take out even the washing machine and wood stove. We're both on the mortgage, and I didn't abandon the place- and there's nothing filed against me, 'cos I didn't do shit against her and won't start now.

Real estate is GOOD.

I never planned to run a studio, exactly- I had huge plans like building a massive facility, and I had little plans like hotrodding my guitar. But now I'm working semi-steadily in mastering- and making up the gap with writing software plugins that another company (Kagi) is selling for me- so I'm saving David's words and tattooing them on my fucking heart. Hell, if he was local I'd bend heaven and earth to hire him- I don't have anybody as good as that around here, I have to fend for myself.

I'm pushing 40, and I salute the artist formerly known as Ekko. I wouldn't have guessed you were a kid because as far as savvy, wisdom and simple experience, you're not- I've got less mileage, and I'm the learner here even though there are other areas, even related areas, that I've really put work into. You gotta learn when the opportunity presents itself.

MacGregor
March 30th, 2007, 03:18 PM
all the while being a friendly, caring dude whos always willing to share his wisdom to those who want it, but never forces his opinions. oh, and the first time i ever got drunk, it was his shout!


I.CAN.RESIST!









I.CAN.RESIST!









I.CAN.RESIST!







I.CAN.RESIST!








I.CAN.RESIST!







Okay, I can't.





Did dude often use words like, say, 'fuck' or sumthing?

Mac

Zoesch
March 30th, 2007, 05:27 PM
Excellent story mate...

Once you walk out with the realization that you have done good and have learned a valuable lesson in the process nothing else matters really.

eagan
March 30th, 2007, 09:56 PM
Ekko, that was the best fucking post that has come across the wires since this place opened.

Mods, if this place is going to have a section called "Womb U", make sure that nobody can possibly enter the place without noticing this.

Too good.


JLE

Spock
March 30th, 2007, 10:29 PM
Speachless....


This should be required reading.

:Thumbsup: :Thumbsup: :Thumbsup:

Brendo
March 30th, 2007, 11:08 PM
pff... coulda been harder.








ok, i kid, i kid!









coulda been a LOT harder.


Seriously though, top post.

knightsy
March 31st, 2007, 02:16 AM
Some of the best reasons to go freelance that I've ever seen!

jerryskid
March 31st, 2007, 06:32 AM
everytime I feel afraid...
there's that hook in my head
everytime I feell down
there's a hook in my head

It never stops...
the groove keeps rolling....


I lay everything down
for the hook in my head...


as long as the hook is there, biite hard...........

pounce
March 31st, 2007, 12:40 PM
everyone interested in this business ought to get a copy of this instead of a sweetwater catalog. this is more informative. i'm calling this required reading for all wombats.

robmacki
March 31st, 2007, 04:24 PM
where do I begin.....

well, you think you have gray hair now, try owning a studio at 47 with a 21 yr old daughter.
'nuf said.

Brendo
March 31st, 2007, 04:33 PM
where do I begin....

a 21 yr old daughter.
'nuf said.

could I have her number? i'm 20, australian, and i'm uh... well... that's about all i've got going for me...

nobby
March 31st, 2007, 05:40 PM
That's an inpirational story David.

During the years since I'd first seen your posts in the recpit you've proven the value of determination and believing in yourself. I just looked up perseverance in the dictionary and your picture was there :Wink:

Glad you made it through the tough times and can afford to take a break :Thumbsup: :Thumbsup:

robmacki
March 31st, 2007, 06:04 PM
could I have her number? i'm 20, australian, and i'm uh... well... that's about all i've got going for me...

I'll tell her you called.

robmacki
March 31st, 2007, 07:49 PM
everyone interested in this business ought to get a copy of this instead of a sweetwater catalog. this is more informative. i'm calling this required reading for all wombats.

I vote this to be a sticky in Womb U and that David be given an honorary professorship at WU.

Tim Halligan
April 1st, 2007, 03:31 AM
I vote this to be a sticky in Womb U and that David be given an honorary professorship at WU.

Yup.


I can see it now...the name painted on the door:

Professor Fucking Emeritus
David Fucking Aurora.

Say fuck twice, then fucking enter...

:lol:

Cheers,
Tim

David Aurora
April 1st, 2007, 03:57 AM
could I have her number? i'm 20, australian, and i'm uh... well... that's about all i've got going for me...

dude, if i make it past 27 and get to robs situation, there wouldnt be a chance in hell of my daughter going within 10 kilometres of an engineeer :lol:




glad my post struck a chord....well, not, i mean i dont wish this shit on people, but....you know what i mean.

profuckinfessor david

Brendo
April 1st, 2007, 03:59 AM
dude, if i make it past 27 and get to robs situation, there wouldnt be a chance in hell of my daughter going within 10 kilometres of an engineeer :lol:

Point taken!

Tim Halligan
April 1st, 2007, 04:02 AM
profuckinfessor david



Perfect...into the spirit of it already...


:D


Cheers,
Tim

robmacki
April 1st, 2007, 04:04 AM
Ahhh
I'm so glad I can trust you guys

:lol:

MacGregor
April 1st, 2007, 10:56 AM
Ahhh
I'm so glad I can trust you guys

:lol:

Yep, your daughter would be in good hands.

Mac

PS: Have some pics?

Cosmic Pig
April 1st, 2007, 05:26 PM
Wellll... I dunno. Great story and all, but there are other realities out there. Like me for fucking instance.

Damn kids. Sometimes you just know they're gonna kick your ass in the financial success dept.

I'm 45 or 46. Played for a long time. Bought a PA and started running it. One of those plug and play powered boards no outboard etc. I notice it don't sound bad so I figure I'm pretty good at sound haha fuck.

Guitar rag sez " hey this 8 track is digital and you can record your own music". Being a great soundman I buy it. Fuck.

Well it sounds like fucking hell... so then the recording rag sez I need better shit to sound good. Fuck.

So I buy better shit and it still sounds like hell. Fuck.

After buying enough shit I know should sound reasonable it dawns on me I don't know fuckall about sound... fuck.

Trouble is I'm trying to pay off about 12 grand worth of shit on a musicians wage. Fuck.

8 years later I'm still sitting in the Room Of Pain. No control room, no big titty receptionist, no customers, just me in the basement. Sounds are getting better.

Then I hear about a CD floating around recorded at a mid level studio with mediocre sound that kix ass, and how the studio has great sounds. I hear the CD. Sound is mediocre production is great. So now I'm a producer. I rounded up some buddies who play good and I'm recording some kick ass trax for almost free.

I'm having fun, but fuck.

Cos.

santeri
April 1st, 2007, 06:08 PM
I'm David Aurora, and I'm a low budget studio owner :Cry:

Sticky.



Awesome post Dave.

burnsy
April 2nd, 2007, 03:28 AM
I really enjoyed that and appreciate the factor of your efforts. I seem to be in the same sorta situation however im 20 now and I have two live rock venues which arent kitted out well but they are running and I also have two places and heeps of bands liking my sound but I dont know why. I decided to focus on audio last year so the past 12 months has been a massive rollercoaster. I appreciated your typings and I hope that in two years I'll be saying something along the same lines.