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robmacki
April 23rd, 2007, 08:39 PM
So I told my wife I was going to make dinner tonight.

I'm thinking of maybe grilled Salmon in olive oil, with a Lime, Cilantro, Jalapeņo sauce (Mayo based) sweet potato fries (in olive oil) and steamed veggies.

And so I thought I'd share those deep thoughts and also post some of my favorite dishes too.

The first is the classic Eggs Benedict with Asparagus that I always cook on Christmas morning, sometimes Mother's Day.

The second is Alaskan Cod with Wild Rice and Broccoli, Lime Hollandaise Sauce and garnished with Cilantro, Jalapeņo, and Mango. YUM YUM!!

So enjoy and chime in.

Dinner is served!:Coolio:

jerryskid
April 23rd, 2007, 08:48 PM
I cooked in restaurants for years....So I'm sick of it....though I do make a mean Hot Dog Chili.......

bunnerabb
April 23rd, 2007, 09:02 PM
I cook all the time.

Roasts, curries, spaghetti, Jamaican jerk chicken, seafood, omelets, quiche, poultry.. my soup needs work.

I make a wicked sandwich, too.

Not just any baboon can slap an appealing sammich together, mind yer. :)

Aardvark
April 23rd, 2007, 09:21 PM
...The first is the classic Eggs Benedict with Asparagus that I always cook on Christmas morning, sometimes Mother's Day.

The second is Alaskan Cod with Wild Rice and Broccoli, Lime Hollandaise Sauce and garnished with Cilantro, Jalapeņo, and Mango. YUM YUM!!


Nice presentation, especially on the Cod dish.

I'm modestly handy in the kitchen and enjoy having guests for dinner. One of the regulars has been quite smitten with my pork tenderloin variations of late.

Can't bake to save my ass which is fine with me.

I tried an easy baked chicken thing last night with garlic, honey, sesame seeds and soya, served on sticky rice with roasted green beans. I have leftovers if a certain person is reading this before it's too late.



Cheers,
Aardvark

:Wink:

G. Hoffman
April 23rd, 2007, 09:22 PM
Go to the store, find what looks good, and make them taste good together.

At least, that's what I try to do.



Gabriel

MacGregor
April 23rd, 2007, 09:52 PM
Seems I'm a minority here because I absolutely HATE cooking.

Sucks.

Waste of time.

Can't stand standing near something tasty to eat and just wait.

Glad MacWifey loves cooking...

MacHungryNow

lebouche
April 23rd, 2007, 10:41 PM
WHo's gonna start the womb recipe book :)
I can only cook a few things....stews, roasts, bangers n mash.
Hope to get better...my lady is an excellent cook and I'm getting too fat!

Smileyblue
April 23rd, 2007, 10:44 PM
Those dishes look mighty appertising my man.

I tell you there is nothing better than a man that can cook.

I have a husband that makes THE best breakfast food I have ever had.

On the flip side, if there is one thing people will remember me for, it will be my cooking. I have large dinner parties all the time just so that I can prep for 3 days prior. It is an addiction for me.

Just ask Aardy, I make a mean Sticky Date Pudding.

Ya'll should try it. It is the most sinful dessert ever......

Cheers
Smileyblue

ggunn
April 23rd, 2007, 10:51 PM
So I told my wife I was going to make dinner tonight.

I'm thinking of maybe grilled Salmon in olive oil, with a Lime, Cilantro, Jalapeņo sauce (Mayo based) sweet potato fries (in olive oil) and steamed veggies.

And so I thought I'd share those deep thoughts and also post some of my favorite dishes too.

The first is the classic Eggs Benedict with Asparagus that I always cook on Christmas morning, sometimes Mother's Day.

The second is Alaskan Cod with Wild Rice and Broccoli, Lime Hollandaise Sauce and garnished with Cilantro, Jalapeņo, and Mango. YUM YUM!!

So enjoy and chime in.

Dinner is served!:Coolio:

I do about 25% of the cooking at my house - all the grilling and some of the microwave/stovetop stuff. I am at my best when I am grilling fish or pork loin (ever since my cholesterol report a few years back I don't grill much beef any more). Last night I did a slab of mahi in butter, garlic, and herbs in a pan over mesquite that was pretty good. Portabello mushrooms, too, with garlic, red wine and three kinds of cheese.

lebouche
April 23rd, 2007, 10:51 PM
Oh shit!! Thats your dog we've seen having a threesome at Ardys place!!
My first bestiality video was at the Womb :) (and hopefully last).
How did your dog become a net porn star smiley?

Johnny
April 23rd, 2007, 11:02 PM
I'm good with the grill and pretty okay at Indian dishes.

mousdrvr
April 23rd, 2007, 11:22 PM
LeBouche!

Great thread start.

Not a master by any stretch but I do Love to cook. And Like Aardvark and Smiley, I like to cook for a few people. It's a great way to remember what's really important in life. When we were in Austin, I had the full on kitchen and cooked enough to start getting efficient, like keeping a bowl of chopped garlic and basil in olive oil, but back in Cali we have about 1/5 the house and 1/5 the time. Still It's fun to cook.

My most recent discovery is Cumin what a spice! How I've missed it all these years, especially with the type of food I like to eat is beyond me.

I can't bake either but Lily is a master so we've got it covered.



-mous

robmacki
April 23rd, 2007, 11:31 PM
My most recent discovery is Cumin what a spice! How I've missed it all these years, especially with the type of food I like to eat is beyond me.



Same here. IMHO Cumin is one of the secrets to great Mexican food. It also lowers blood sugar.:very happy:

dnafe
April 23rd, 2007, 11:41 PM
Only three dishes besides KD special

Scalloped potatoes

Lasagna

Spagetti

I have been know to make decent Fajitas so I suppose I should include them too

And for those big Turkey dinners...wife does the turkey and I do everything else.

Works for me

Aardvark
April 23rd, 2007, 11:46 PM
...Just ask Aardy, I make a mean Sticky Date Pudding.

Ya'll should try it. It is the most sinful dessert ever......


Let me say this about Smiley's Sticky Date Pudding.



A number of you know that my eldest Sister is world class chef. Simple fact.


TV shows, James Beard institute guest, acclaimed restaurant, best selling author....yada, yada, yada she fucking rocks...and she is very, very good at desserts.




Best dessert I ever had is Smiley's Sticky Date Pudding.



It wasn't some kind of fluke as she has repeated this triumph with aplomb and considerable ease whilst deep in the Canadian wilderness.



Caveat...you will gain six pounds just thinking about it once have tried it.



You gain ten pounds just looking at it as waits to cool off and tempts you to burn your mouth like the Sirens of Titan.


You gain no weight eating it because your mid-body load loss is beyond belief.




Long live Smileyblue's Sticky Date Pudding.



Cheers,
CoronaryonthewayVark


:lol::grin::grin::Surprised::Thumbsup:

robmacki
April 23rd, 2007, 11:52 PM
Check this out:

cookingforengineers.com (http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=171):lol:

My brother-in-law was telling me about "Beer Can Chicken" and with Barbi season almost here I thought I'd look up a recipe and found this site.

dikledoux
April 24th, 2007, 12:19 AM
I cook a pretty good Gumbo and a Catfish Courtbullion. And I do turkey on the BBQ pit that absolutely kills.

My wife realized I was the one when I brought food over. Up til then she wasn't so sure.

dik

emtou2u
April 24th, 2007, 01:28 AM
OK....we need a cookbook...!!!!

as it is...I open the womb...just to do my pix from Netflix (so many good ones i haven't seen...)

now...i keep hearing about Gabby's cookin' and now i'm dyin' for the smiley blue puddin' !

i understand double-top secret recipes...but hey...if there is a favorite that you are willing to share...i'm willing to add it to my arsenal!

xo

-em

Johnny
April 24th, 2007, 02:50 AM
Cumin and turmeric are the soul of a lot of food I like.

I'mona post my wife's Papaw's buttermilk pie recipe. Y'all are in for a treat.

weedywet
April 24th, 2007, 03:08 AM
serious cook...
I cook whenever I'm home (although we also go out at least one night a week, again if I'm home)

I like spicy, flavourful food of any ethnicity,

and I like just playing around with techniques to learn them better.

Basically I like to try to make as close to "restaurant" food as possible.
I'm not much for homemade comfort food. (maybe because my mother never made any!)

tonight I made:
citrus crusted seared tuna with two sauces - roasted red pepper/chipotle sauce, and tomatillo/horseradish sauce.

garlic roasted asparagus

purple potatoes


arugola (rocket) and endive salad with grapefruit sherry vinaigrette

DigitMus
April 24th, 2007, 06:23 AM
Well, I admit I'm a bit of a ringer (I trained with a Cordon Bleu instructor in the 80s), but I do all the cooking around here. My girlfriend doesn't cook, so it works out well. My Roast duck with carmalized onion cherry merlot sauce is almost legendary. I do Thai, Cajun, Italian and a lot of un-namable "fusion" cuisine.

Here's a quick one anybody can do. Cold Summer Soup

1lb. Roma Tomatoes, 1lb. Vidalia Onion, 1 fist full of fresh basil.
Chop all ingredients (coarsely), simmer in chicken stock (just enough to cover everything) until onions are soft. Put in food processor (i.e. Cuisinart) with 1/2 pint heavy cream, blend, but don't puree (you want some small chunks). Chill; serve with croutons.

Enjoy!

Scott

Grapestomper
April 24th, 2007, 06:59 AM
Right on to DigitMus for actually putting up a recipe! I'm gonna try that this summer once the tomatoes get good.

Just yesterday we made a batch of what I'll call "Grapestomper's Secret Frenchanese Sauce.


Add one ginger root, one head of chopped garlic, and some citrus zest to 2 bottles (1.5l) of Pinot Noir in a sauce pan, and reduce this down to aprox 1/2 cup of liquid over high heat. (takes about half an hour)

Add two bottles of balsamic vinegar (as expensive as you wanna make 'em, but usually mid-range) and further reduce over heat to about 1 cup or less total volume.

{Two important notes... first: OPEN ALL YOUR WINDOWS! There will be a spectacular amount of acetic acid in the air. Second: you have to watch it. It will go from almost-done to smoke and ash in half a minute. When it behaves like a syrup rather than a liquid, it's almost there.}

Now turn down the heat, and add an entire bottle of soy sauce. (the 20 oz bottles).

While this slowly comes back up to temperature, stir in one pound of sugar, a little at a time.

Remove from heat before it boils, and strain out the solids.

Pour into small bottles to store and use as needed.


I put it on pan-fried trout over rice, among a great many other things...


It's all about the sauces,
Mike

lebouche
April 24th, 2007, 07:50 AM
LeBouche!

Great thread start.


-mous

Hey mous, how's it hanging :)
Rob Mackie started this thread so all reps to him please :).
Yes tis a cool thread:Thumbsup:

lebouche
April 24th, 2007, 07:52 AM
serious cook...

Why do I get the feeling evreything you do, you do seriously:grin:

Goes211
April 24th, 2007, 11:47 AM
Can I chime in and vouch for Smileyblue's Sticky Date Pudding ?
That stuff is amazing.

Lemme also put in a good word for Sir Aardvark, who is too modest when it comes to his abilities in the kitchen.
He will kick you out of his kitchen when he is cooking though.
"GET. OUT. OF. MY. KITCHEN" (tm)(c) Aardvark

And then, there is Monsieur Malice, whose haute cuisine I've enjoyed quite a few times.

Me, I'm quite handy...some of my regular endeavours include chicken Korma, duck breast ā l'orange, ginger carrots, and devilish garlic/lime marinated chicken with a peanut sauce.

Speaking of garlic...how about a nice aïoli ? With a mediterranean fish soup ? Isn't it beginning to smell like garlic in here...yummy !
:Coolio:

The Womb Cook Book !
WE just GOTTA do that.
:Thumbsup:

J.G.
April 24th, 2007, 12:18 PM
Love to cook, LOVE to eat, LOVE food porn, loving this thread.

Especially at this moment in time--I am extremely hungry.

I just drooled, no kiddin'...

Tonight, some shrimp kebabs in a Herbs de' Provence marinade, steamed asparagus with a walnut oil/soya-sauce/garlic/lemon-laced drizzle, and a couple wee baked patats served simple, with butter, a dollup of fromage blanc, salt and peppa.

Plus a nice lil chilled Vin d' Alsace to wash it down.

Life's been a lil hard here lately with a very ill pooch in the family, who only now after near two weeks of hospital-life and crisis', is appearing to be improving. Eating for me for some time, has been apperantly sub-sustinence-levels, so tonight's chow will be incredibley welcomed in the relief of this new hope.

BON AP, All,

: J

robmacki
April 24th, 2007, 03:13 PM
Here is the recipe for Eggs Benedict:

Some will use a double boiler for the Hollandaise, I don't go that far with it. I also have a 5min microwave version that I might also post later. Enjoy

Eggs Benedict

Makes 2 servings.

First the recipe for Hollandaise Sauce:
(This is THE BEST Hollandaise Sauce I have ever tasted and everyone else who has had it loves it.)

Ingredients:
5 egg yokes
1 cube of butter (not margarine)
juice of 1 real lemon

1. Butter must be soft, room temp. Zap for 10 sec at a time until soft and let stand for now.
2. In a sauce pan (the wider the better) add 5 separated egg yokes and the juice of 1 lemon together. Begin whipping with a spring whip (whisk can work too) on MEDIUM heat until thick. This may take 10 min or so. YOU MUST STIR CONTINUOUSLY! It takes patience but it is worth it! The EggYoke/Lemon will become the consistency of pudding. THIS IS THE CRITICAL TRANSITION!
3. Remove from heat and add ONE Tbl spoon of Butter and whip in until it is mixed before adding more butter.
4. Repeat 3. until all butter is mixed into the Sauce.
5. Dust top w/ Lawry's Seasoned Salt and stir in. (remember you can add more if you like but you can't add less)
6. Add 2 TWO DROPS of Worcestershire Sauce and stir in. (if more than two drops get in, SPOON 'EM OUT)
If you can taste the Worcestershire there is too much but if it not there you know something is missing.

Set aside from heat until ready to serve.

BTW other good dishes w/ Hollandaise Sauce are:
Artichokes, Broccoli, Asparagus, Chicken Oscar, and Sword Fish!

If you have made it this far the rest is easy.

For Eggs Benedict you will need:
1 - 2 eggs per serving
1 English Muffin per serving
1 - 2 Slices of Canadian Bacon per serving

1. In a frying pan glaze the slices of Canadian Bacon in a little butter and a squeeze of lemon.
2. Poach eggs. Egg poachers work best but if you don't have one, read the manual. (boiling water w/a spoon of vinegar)
Eggs should be firm but yoke should run to mix w/ sauce.
3. Toast the English Muffin
4. Butter the English Muffin.

Putting it together:

First English Muffin, then Canadian Bacon, then egg, then Hollandaise Sauce!
If you want to get French, place Spinach in between the muffin and bacon.


If you read this far and try it, you will never be the same!

Enjoy!

Rob

studiomusic
April 24th, 2007, 10:28 PM
It pisses me off that I can cook well... my wife will ONLY eat what I have made!
Cookin' is like mixin' I guess...

Swafford
April 24th, 2007, 10:53 PM
I've done lot's of cooking, nothing fancy, restaurants, short order, hippy houses and a house of hardcore bikers in New Jersey that was, um, entertaining. I produce lot's of stuff in my garden for our consumption.

My thing is what my granny use to call country baking and I run very small baking business. Muffins, coffeecakes, pies and bread, mostly organic and locally sourced ingredients.

jeffjuliano
April 25th, 2007, 12:06 AM
I cook all the time. Mostly "Whop" food since I have the genes for it. My wife is a sushi chef but since thats what she does all day she rarely brings any home. Which sucks for me. I am going to mount a lcd in my new mix room with Giada Delorentis cooking in front of me all day.

Jeff

jeffjuliano
April 25th, 2007, 12:13 AM
It pisses me off that I can cook well... my wife will ONLY eat what I have made!
Cookin' is like mixin' I guess...

Cooking is just like mixing actually. The Shun knives and All Clad pans are like a nice rack of neve 1073's and tube limiters. The perfect recipe is a great song. However, the bogus filet or 2 day old fish from super fresh could be the equivalent of a terrible drummer which winds up ruining all of it in the end.

Everyone reading this knows I'm right.

J.G.
April 25th, 2007, 08:19 AM
Giada Delorentis...

Yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...

; J

David Aurora
April 25th, 2007, 08:44 AM
havent had fuck all time to cook lately but yeah cooking is the shit.

i went veg mid last year so fast food is pretty much non-existant for me now except fries. heres what i pretty much live on in a single serve format:

-get half a cup of red lentils. wash and drain them.
-put 1 and a half cups of water in a pot and set your stove to just above halfway.
- chop up one deadly chilli, crush a few curry leaves, grab a pinch of salt and a dash of turmeric and garam masala (or, if youre me you get the mixed spices my grandma makes which has turmeric and heaps of shit in it) and a little olive oil and chuck them in the water while its heating up. when its almost at the boil chuck the lentils in. stir a bit, bring to boil, then take down to low heat and lid that shit.

meanwhile.....

-3/4 cup basmati rice, a couple bay leaves, a pinch of fennel seeds, a little salt, and a dash of olive oil goes in a microwave rice cooker with 1 and a half cups of water. 5 mins on medium, stir, 5 more mins on medium. cooking rice on a stovetop is for losers. while its doing that, stir the lentils every now and then. when the rice is nearly done, pop the lid off the lentils and let the steam make some of the water content go bye-byes.

put the rice on a plate. grab a big scoop of the mush in the pot (should be slightly watery disgusting looking mush) and pour it all over the rice.

grab a jar of Fern's lime chilli pickle (the one labeled 'hot'). about a teaspoon of that gunk will do. put it on the rice/mush and stir it all together.

enjoy.

thats my tried and true method of making dal and rice with punch. its pretty healthy, tastes awesome, looks like vomit and smells like a fart if you put it in the fridge, although the smell goes away when re-heated

Tim Halligan
April 25th, 2007, 10:28 AM
Seems I'm a minority here because I absolutely HATE cooking.

Sucks.

Waste of time.

Can't stand standing near something tasty to eat and just wait.



You ain't the only one...

I cook for me...badly. I've got a very limited repetoire, and consequently I'm boring myself into a very bad mood. :Mad:

Cheers,
Tim

Buzzgrowl
April 25th, 2007, 10:47 AM
In the past years I have moved away from trying combinations of ingredients as the focus, to the treatment of ingredients (cutting, heating, chemically altering) as the focus of my cooking experiments.

One very cool method I have discovered is slow cooking meats at very low temperatures. Low means anywhere between 80 and 110 centigrade. Slow means lots of hours. A 2kg leg of lamb (with bone) could be cooked between 5 (at 110c) and 6.5 (at 80c) hours. A 2kg rump roast beef about 2 hours (a 110c). I needed to learn my oven and how efficiently it bakes and how precise the thermostats are (i.e. how does it translate). All meats should be cooked in a roast rack. You can flavor the meat in any way you like before hand. As for salting, I like to pour gros sel over it and shake of the excess. Once the roasting is done, resting for up to 30 minutes is recommended (if the piece is about 2kg or more). Also, cutting with a serrated knife does not work for me (too much juice flows out). Finally, slow cooking does not work for crispy skinned pork roast.

The idea of slow cooking is that it produces a more tender roast with more intense flavors without too much seasoning and spice. It could be junk science, but I've heard that flavors and smells (i.e. their molecules) decompose at high temperatures. On the other hand, sugars caramelize at about 110 centigrade and thus you need this minimum temperature to get that roasted flavor. To get this at a lower temperature (eg. 80 c), apparently you can brand the roast with a very hot sharpening steel (nb.: I have not tried this) making nice criss-cross or whatever designs you fancy. I just stick to 110c because I have small kids and proper temperature and cooking through is important.

A nice side-benefit is that slow cooking leaves your oven spotless as it does not produce spurts and squirts of oil, fat or cooking juices that burn and smoke.

Does anyone have experience with soaking roasts in brine before cooking?

Bon ap!
Buzzgrowl

ggunn
April 25th, 2007, 04:17 PM
Does anyone have experience with soaking roasts in brine before cooking?


I always brine a pork loin before cooking it. The brine is a mixture of salt, brown sugar, and water. It really makes it stay moist through cooking. I sear the outside over a hot fire and then move it off the direct heat and slow cook it up to 150 degrees.

Aardvark
April 25th, 2007, 04:28 PM
Cooking is just like mixing actually. The Shun knives and All Clad pans are like a nice rack of neve 1073's and tube limiters. The perfect recipe is a great song. However, the bogus filet or 2 day old fish from super fresh could be the equivalent of a terrible drummer which winds up ruining all of it in the end.

Agreed.


Everyone reading this knows I'm right.


Well...if they didn't before they do now!!
:lol::lol:


Cheers,
SousVark

bunnerabb
April 25th, 2007, 04:36 PM
I do pot roasts in an electric wok type thing set on simmer.

Add 1/2 cup of water, salt, pepper and McCormick's Montreal Beef Seasoning, half a chopped onion...

Simmer for about 6 hours until it's starting to fall apart, flip, simmer another hour, then remove lid and let the liquid start to deglaze.

Use the roastie as a sop and rub it around the building glaze in the pan until it has this caramelized, spicy, salty goo all over it and scrape what's left in the pan onto the roast and serve.

Aardvark
April 25th, 2007, 04:41 PM
I always brine a pork loin before cooking it. The brine is a mixture of salt, brown sugar, and water. It really makes it stay moist through cooking. I sear the outside over a hot fire and then move it off the direct heat and slow cook it up to 150 degrees.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/e-coli/DG00005

I was taught, rather emphatically, that 160f is the lowest temperature to kill E.coli and 175f was the guideline we followed in the kitchen where I was trained.


Cheers,
Aardvark
:icon_eek:

bunnerabb
April 25th, 2007, 04:52 PM
NFS guidelines say 140 F is standard minimum for holding hot foods.

At least in the USA, AFAIK.

Unfcknblvbl
April 25th, 2007, 05:02 PM
I do pot roasts in an electric wok type thing set on simmer.



Hmmm...I'm ASSuming this would work for a Crock Pot, too.
Yes? No?

I'm not a cook, nor do I play one on t.v., but my spaghetti sauce, pork chops, and peanut butter n' jelly sandwiches have drawn raves...

Aardvark
April 25th, 2007, 05:09 PM
NFS guidelines say 140 F is standard minimum for holding hot foods.

At least in the USA, AFAIK.


Holding is NOT cooking. There is a big difference.

E.Coli dies at and above 150f everywhere on earth!!

:Thumbsup:


Cheers,
Aardvark

ggunn
April 25th, 2007, 05:09 PM
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/e-coli/DG00005

I was taught, rather emphatically, that 160f is the lowest temperature to kill E.coli and 175f was the guideline we followed in the kitchen where I was trained.


Cheers,
Aardvark
:icon_eek:

According to Hormel's website

http://www.hormel.com/templates/knowledge/knowledge.asp?catitemid=129&id=906

for beef, 170 degrees is well done. I wouldn't want to eat a steak that was cooked to 175 degrees.

Azraphael
April 25th, 2007, 05:57 PM
My approach to cooking has always been improvisational.

To my knowledge, I have never actually followed a recipe. I reference them (my wife has tons of cookbooks), but it's a quick skim of "what did they put in this?" and then I go off and do my own thing.

I leave specific measurements of ingredients to the bakers, of which I am certainly not one.

I don't make a lot of stuff, but the people I've fed seem to like it. I'm certainly no world class chef, but I do have fun in the kitchen. So, while I can't share specific recipes, here's a rough idea of a personal favourite that's easy to do:

- Mix cream cheese, green onion, black pepper, and crushed roasted garlic together in a bowl

- Hammer down skinless, boness chicken breasts to between 12cm and 1cm thick

- Paste one side of the chicken breasts with a generous amount of the cream cheese mix

- Roll up the chicken breasts, tie with string

- Coat chicken in seasoned breadcrumbs

- Bake at 350 for 20-30 minutes

I typically serve this over rice (a combination of long grain and wild), with a sauce made from a base of white wine, chicken stock, spanish onions and (occasionally) heavy cream.

I know it's not a recipe, but it sure is tasty!

By the way, I can, without any hesitation, vouch for Aardy's sister's cooking. One of the best meals I've had in the last 5 years, without question.

Cheers,

Dave

Aardvark
April 25th, 2007, 06:00 PM
According to Hormel's website

http://www.hormel.com/templates/knowledge/knowledge.asp?catitemid=129&id=906

for beef, 170 degrees is well done. I wouldn't want to eat a steak that was cooked to 175 degrees.

F...not C.

There is a considerable difference between outside temp and inside...many variables. Either way...E.coli dies at 150f.

While discussing beef... a nice way to cook roast beef is in a convection oven, on a tray, lightly covered with tin foil and set at 275F.

With a convection oven you get the speed of the higher temp and the benefits of the lower temp.




Cheers,
Aardvark

J.G.
April 25th, 2007, 06:29 PM
We have a convection oven, and I likey.


Holding is NOT cooking. There is a big difference.

*snorts* :Razz:

; J

Buzzgrowl
April 26th, 2007, 01:33 PM
... The brine is a mixture of salt, brown sugar, and water...

Tks ggunn!

Like so many people I love bbq but I'm lazy and I find fiddling flipping around meat on a hot day sweating next to a flame, mildly annoying - not to speak of inhaling smoke and fumes that generally decrease for me the intensity of the flavors and the eating later on. To overcome this I do two things.

The first is bbq-ing a whole leg of lamb - this decreases the screwing around the bbq (at the expense of increasing screwing around the day before, in preparation). To do this you need to take out the bone and then slice the leg at strategic points to get it to fold out into a one big roundish steak about 4-6 cm thick. It should look kind of like the shape of Africa once its laid out. Take a huge piece of aluminum foil (say 80x60 cm, you can make one out of two smaller pieces) and place 4-5 soup spoons of Greek yogurt and spread it out to make a blotch the size of the meat unfolded. On the blotch of yogurt place some mildly crushed mint twigs and coriander twigs (just rub them in your hand for a few seconds), chopped up spring onions and 2-3 cloves of crushed garlic, pepper and salt (gros sel is better) and a drizzle of olive oil. Then put the meat external/fatty side down on this bed of yogurt, herbs and seasoning. Do the same to the inside part of the meat, where the bone once was, but in reverse - first the olive oil, then the salt and pepper, garlic, spring onions, herbs, and finish of with a couple of spoons of Greek yogurt). Then, using the excess of the foil sticking out, wrap the leg, nice and tight so it resembles a silver cylinder. Put the cylinder in a plastic bag and stick it in the fridge for 24h.

I bbq on a Weber, so you may need to adjust depending on your equipment. When the coals are just right, I push some of them away to get a little less heat on a third to half the grill. Take out the lamb from its package and give it a good shake so that that the herb twigs fall of. Pop it on the hotter part of the grill to sear each side for several minutes. Then move it to the cooler side and put the lid down so that it is yawning open, the closed end being on the cooler side where the meat is. I cook it medium well done and it usually takes about 4 flips, each about ten minutes. When it comes of the fire, I'll cover it with a little foil and let it rest 10-15 minutes before cutting.

The second thing is to make a big martini cocktail. I find martinis cleanse my taste buds (and brain). I have heard all sorts of angles as to the proportion of gin (or vodka) and vermouth and any comments as to why you think a particular one is good or better are very welcome!

Start by putting a bottle of Bombay gin and a light whiskey (eg. J&B, nothing fancy) in your freezer and a bottle of Noilly Pratt Vermouth in your fridge the day before the bbq. To serve, get a Thermos Pump Beverage Pot and fill it up with the entire bottle of gin, the entire bottle of vermouth and one cup (1 dl) of whiskey. Stir it slightly and assemble the pump. Then pump your martinis until you're done, or the meat is done, whichever. Do not put ice cubes in the thermos: I did this once and produced a shardonnay of sorts.

I would usually drink a southern/sunny wine with the bbq lamb - shiraz/syrah, grenache, nero d'avola or tempranillo, or some blend of these, regardless of the country origin.

BTW, does anyone have a plausible or scientific (or both) explanation as to why does the internal temperature of a large roast increase after you take it out of the oven?

cheers!

bunnerabb
April 26th, 2007, 01:38 PM
Hmmm...I'm ASSuming this would work for a Crock Pot, too.
Yes? No?

I'm not a cook, nor do I play one on t.v., but my spaghetti sauce, pork chops, and peanut butter n' jelly sandwiches have drawn raves...

Y"up.

Only you don't get that glaze finish on it.

I used the crock pot for years, for that, until I discovererd the joy of caramelised beef goo.

ggunn
April 26th, 2007, 11:52 PM
F...not C.



Well, yes; aren't we all talking Fahrenheit? 175 degrees F is 5 degrees over well done, and I don't like my steaks that thoroughly cooked.

st robert
April 27th, 2007, 05:06 PM
just for laughs, it's worth noting that there's no meaningful way that any e. coli bacteria would get inside a piece of meat. it's kind of there because of the butchering process and little bits of poo from the intestines that carry the bacteria might get on the steak, but not in it. the internal temp is still fine at even 125-130 for rare, right? hamburger, obviously has it all mixed in, so unless you controlled the butchering really well, you gotta bring the burger up to that magic 160 at least to guarantee safety.

back to the brined pork: any e. coli is on the outside, so the hot searing will take care of that. other issues with undercooked pork were various worms, trichinosis, etc. those guys die at slightly lower temps. 150ish internal should be ok.

enjoy your parasites.

rob

st robert
April 27th, 2007, 05:10 PM
let me ammend my above post with the point that sticking a thermometer into an undercooked piece of meat could introduce bacteria to the interior of said chunk of flesh via the thermometer itself touching the outside of the steak which is below 160, carrying the bugs to the inside.

good times....

rob

mousdrvr
April 27th, 2007, 05:11 PM
Same here. IMHO Cumin is one of the secrets to great Mexican food. It also lowers blood sugar.:very happy:

Hey Sorry my Bad Thank YOU for the thread start.

You're absolutely right about Cumin in Mexican food. It's THE best way to take youself from Gringo Pud to Culinary Stud. That and having the balls to actually use Lard. :lol: :lol: I'll only go so far as beef drippings form something I've cooked myself though. I think it's the name really. I mean think "Olive Oil" and what do you see? a deeply tanned Claire Forlani in a slighhtly crinkled white linen dress maybe. Now think "Lard" ..... see what I mean? :lol: :lol: :lol:


-mous

Tim Armstrong
April 27th, 2007, 07:03 PM
I'm a little late to this discussion, but I do love to cook!

A few favorites:

Uncle Tim Burgers (recipe originated one night when babysitting my niece and nephew, had to make do with what was on hand!):

Take 2lbs of ground turkey, mix in a couple tablespoons of Worcester Sauce, form into hamburger patties and fry. Toast English Muffins, butter lightly. Put swiss cheese on muffins, add burgers. Ketchup and mustard to taste. Instant happy kids!

Uncle Tim's Bachelor Chicken:

Marinade skinless boneless chicken breast in White Wine Worcester Sauce (now labeled "Lea and Perrins Marinade for Chicken") for one hour. Season with "McCormacks California-style Lemon Pepper", broil. Serve with rice and a spinach salad.

Uncle Tim's Pork Chops

Coat the bottom of a cast iron skillet with olive oil. Add one chopped yellow onion and bring to medium high heat. Stir the onions once or twice, push them to the edges of the skillet and then place two thick boneless pork loin chops in the center. Season with equal parts salt, pepper and garlic powder. Saute until the juices start to pool on top of the chops, then turn, seasoning this side as before. Keep stirring the onions (don't want to burn them!). When juices start to pool again, chops are done. Put them on the plates, put the sauteed onions on top, and serve with rice.


I also have a smoker and like making smoked brisket, turkey breast and pork ribs. My all-purpose bbq rub: equal parts salt, pepper and paprika. Mmmmm good!

Last but not least, I make pizza from scratch, using a bread machine to make the dough (I use a French honey bread recipe for the dough). I put the dough in a well-greased skillet and top with mozzerella, sliced roma tomatoes, chopped onions, garlic and basil.

Cheers, Tim

Tim Armstrong
April 28th, 2007, 11:15 PM
Last but not least, I make pizza from scratch, using a bread machine to make the dough (I use a French honey bread recipe for the dough). I put the dough in a well-greased skillet and top with mozzerella, sliced roma tomatoes, chopped onions, garlic and basil.

I forgot to add: put skillet in oven preheated to 420 F. Look in after about ten minutes, and keep checking it until the cheese starts to get a little brown around the edges!

Cheers, Tim

Bryson
May 2nd, 2007, 01:22 PM
Yeah..the worse t' sure sauce makes ground turkey seem a lot more like beef. Great for turkey meat loaf too.

I cook great Italian, Mexican, Indian, etc.......I like very spicey food.

I barbeque beef and fish, but tend to overcook chicken for fear of being undercooked (I'm getting better though).


For eggs benedict, I use smoked salmon instead of Canadian bacon. Fresh spinach goes good in there too. Top with fresh parsley or dill.


Thyme!