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View Full Version : A very interesting paper about monitors


Bob Olhsson
February 29th, 2008, 05:33 PM
http://www.celticaudio.co.uk/articles/science.pdf

meLoCo_go
February 29th, 2008, 07:16 PM
Well, my first impression is that 'science.pdf' is probably too much suspicious for a title.

eagan
February 29th, 2008, 08:01 PM
I'm not so interested.

Went and read it.

My basic impression was it's six pages of stuff in a sort of pseudo-academic style that tries to come of as something heavy and substantial but doesn't really get into much actual clarity and detail.

You could just about cover it like this: "degradation of audio by data compression is not noticed as easily if listening through crappy speakers".

Shit, that didn't take anywhere near six pages.


JLE

Immanuel
February 29th, 2008, 08:49 PM
Some parts of the Celtic Audio paper are either wrong or I don't understand them. I've had too little sleep and 3 hours of statistics (in English!) this afternoon, so the later option is quite possible.

I.E. they state that sine tones has no bandwidth (fair enough) but also that only transients has bandwidth. With this statement, all real world sounds are transients.

They say there are no scientific explanations for how spaced pair microphones creates a virtual stereo image. I believe such an explanation does exist and that it is based on the old Hass effect. More reading about that subject can be found here: http://www.moultonlabs.com/more/audio_window/

There where more parts that challenged my brain, while reading the paper - some parts made my brain go "I don't think so" other parts made my brain go "I wish this was in Danish. I don't get it". I am not saying all is bullshit, but I tend to agree with eagan.

The 700ms transient thing is new to me. I would like to read more about it.

meLoCo_go
March 1st, 2008, 10:40 AM
Both eagan and Immanuel have said the same what I felt.

And poor Heizenberg))) Time/energy compensation was discovered earlier (I believe it was Fourier or even before him) and has nothing to do with quantum effects.