1. #1
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    Default Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    work work work...

    http://musically.com/2016/10/31/is-s...ogical-health/

    “It’s now just like pitching to Radio 1 now when pitching to Spotify playlists,” he said of where the new centre of promotional gravity has moved to. “There is a similar thing happening in America with Spotify and Apple. It’s weird that it used to be algorithms and now human curation is becoming bigger and bigger. It has become like Animal Farm; it is just like pitching radio again.
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    Don't be surprised if the prices go up from this one.

    Still a hell of a lot cheaper than radio in the meantime.
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    Social media is, IMO, a big drag for everyone. I've seen quite a few people go into different stages of depression from all that happens in their facebook lives. Bad news, a seemingly unstoppable addiction to check in every time the little icon tells you you have a notification, etc. I'm definitely trying to distance myself from all that, but, excluding completely quitting (which may be harder for artists), it seems pretty hard.

    This week, someone I know, a very talented graphic artist, posted in her FB page a very interesting story. Apparently, she had been feeling depressed too, so she closed her artist page. A LOT of people following her sent messages saying they were feeling disappointed, that she was mean, etc. She came back to post an apology/explanation of what drove her to do it, and state how far that was from her intentions.
    The sense of entitlement in a lot of people today dumbfounds me. People seem to think they have the right to "own" public figure's lives (which made me think of that wedding video with Jon Bon Jovi attending as a guest and being forced to sing). Makes me sick to my stomach.
    Ah, well... what are we gonna do. The world seems to be happy enough as it is already, driving itself off a cliff. Who knows... maybe we'll land properly wherever that takes us. Life is weird like that.
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    One thing social media does is provide a lot of questionable advice. From the article:

    The always-on culture of social media and its increasing demands for musicians’ time may be bad for their psychological health, according to Cooking Vinyl owner Martin Goldschmidt.
    What is this psychological health thing being referred to here?

    “One of the big changes that has happened is that artists have to be incredibly engaged in social media – and this has been a massive [shift] for artists over the last 10 years,” he said, speaking on a The Future of the Music Industry panel at the BIME conference in Bilbao.
    I don't think that that is necessarily true. In fact, you'd better take the word "incredibly" out of the statement or you won't be good enough at making music people want to hear. Where is all this extra time going to come from?
    “They have to be on several social media platforms and I am just wondering if the next stage is if they are going to have to visually record part of the recording process. Not only will you be able to stream the new release, but you can also see it in VR.”
    So this person is seriously speculating that all musicians make videos of the recording process and put it into VR? Yeah, that should make them all stand out
    Goldschmidt was backed up by Gerhard Behles, CEO of Ableton, who was speaking on the same panel.
    How about hearing from musicians and songwriters instead of a computer guy? who makes monotony machines


    “An artist 30 years ago was very proficient in one facility or two; they might have been a fantastic writer and play an instrument very well,” said Behles.
    And songs and musicianship were better, overall. Does no one see a connection?
    “Most of the people we deal with now have to be proficient at writing, performing, recording [and so on]. That is just going to expand. Now they have to be really good with their social channels. I wonder what kind of personality can survive that.”
    Most people handle mediocrity pretty well. They spend 20 minutes adding loops on garbageband, have convinced themselves that they're geniuses and are ready to move on to the next thing. Actual artists would have a problem with that, of course. And it isn't about having the "kind of personality" that "can survive that", it's about staying alive long enough to spend enough time to get "proficient" at things that aren't really at the core of what you do.
    The pressure that is put on an artist when they are 24/7 exposed to social media and the internet; that is massive psychologically and it causes massive psychological problems, actually. And it is going to get worse because of VR and the way that things are going.”
    And we will all be driving flying cars powered by uranium.

    What pressure?

    There are two common, contradictory idioms that may apply here:

    "Out of sight, out of mind"

    Prov. If you do not see someone or something frequently, you will forget about it.

    This is the thinking behind the "YOU HAVE TO BE ON SOCIAL MEDIA 24/7!!! " with the unspoken presumption being that people will forget about you if you aren't.

    "Absence makes the heart grow fonder"

    Back in the 20th century there was this thing called mystique. For the most part, people didn't feel they needed to know all the repetitive, mundane details of the artist's life and there was no way to constantly update them.

    Big stars usually avoided the media when they weren't starring in it.

    So this caused what would probably now be considered an information deficit. The most successful acts would occasionally pop up in public, but otherwise there would be announcements for a tour or when an album came out or someone was arrested and the occasional print media interview. Other than that, fans would listen to records, look at album covers and posters and fill in the blanks with their imaginations.

    So people speculated what their stars might or might not be like and et voila, you have mystique.

    Fast forward to the selfie generation. Have things changed? Is there no such thing as overexposure? Is a constant need for attention consistent with Psychological Health?

    Moderator Scott Cohen, the founder and VP of international at The Orchard, said that the hype around disintermediation in the music industry a decade ago has fallen flat. The irony, as he sees it, is that there are more – not fewer – hoops that artists have to jump through to reach their audiences.
    Got specifics? Because it seems like the main thing that has changed is that you have more people self-identifying as artists than ever before flooding the market with homogenized DIY product due to the low barrier to entry.
    “10 years ago, if this panel was happening, the buzzword of the day would have been disintermediation – that we won’t need all these people in the industry, it will all collapse and it will be about artists going direct to fan,” said Cohen. “10 years on and there are not fewer people in the middle of the transaction – there are more people in it.”
    Doesn't he realize that making a record isn't a simple transaction and that record companies, recording engineers, producers and promoters aren't merely middle men taking a cut of the action?

    If he's talking about the music industry, there are fewer people involved. But the artist can never go directly to the fan without the real middle man, the Tech Industry, taking a cut of every transaction
    While technology may be making things more arduous for artists,
    Sorry, you haven't made the case. Firstly, that's a grotesquely overreaching generalization.

    We love technology. In fact there is one thing, just one motherfucking thing that technology does that fucks with everything, including artist's minds, and that is enabling rampant piracy.

    The whole "Artists HAVE TO do this, HAVE TO do that goes away when and if people pay money for records because the artist can afford to hire professionals.

    Wenham was not, however, sold on totally utopian thinking around tech here. “I think the access points are a worry because you can still manipulate consumer taste through access points,” she said. “That to me is the big five-year flag – is if the major companies try and manipulate what people get to listen to. Technology is now very much part of our everyday lives.”
    If? IF?

    Yes, indeed. What if companies do what they've been doing since the days of piano rolls? What if we have to live in the real world instead of some mindlessly utopian fantasy?

    Right now I'm wondering if Captain Casino posted that article just to see if he could get my head to explode
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    Before social media I never knew you could kill people with a mix of Drano and Pixie dust.
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    Interesting thoughts nobby. Thanks for taking the time to put that out there. Since landing here, I've struggled with my thoughts around the pros and cons of lowering the barrier to entry. In and outside the scope of music. Much of it came from my slightly fucked up upbringing, being told "no" and "you can't do it that way" a lot. I developed this feeling(overcompensation) of benign charged with enabling anyone who wanted a shot at something. I still feel that way, but I've started to see where it can cause problems.

    My oldest (7) loves playing soccer and works hard at it. Unfortunately he got more of his moms coordination and less of mine(not bragging, just fact). So next year they split into Recreational and Competitive divisions and he's only got one choice ... rec. He'll still have fun, but the understanding of what we're in for is clear. And if by some miracle he develops an ability beyond rec, he can go try out for the competitive team.

    This made me think about how that could that correlate to the music industry. Maybe that's what the Major/Indie/No Label ranks should do? The breakdown in my mind is this though. In the soccer example, my son's game isn't going to be pushed out there as the premier game of the weekend. In fact, outside of the kids and parents, it's not going to be out there at all. The local high school game may get some buzz around town, the Colorado Rapids game will get some more buzz around the state and nationally maybe. But the Arsenal v Tottenham, or US v Mexico (ugh) game will get national and international attention. There's a pretty clear and well formed pecking order for soccer leagues.

    In music, everyone can jam their son's rec game up my ass and trying to act like it's something special. There's no real filter for me to apply.
    On the other hand, if I try to apply the "major label music" filter, they are trying to shove some pop country garbage up my ass and expecting me to believe it's worth paying a premium for.
    In my mind the major label music filter is failing it's job of presenting only top tier music ... forcing people back into the muck to see if they can catch a compelling soccer game elsewhere and becoming increasingly disillusioned.
    Does that thought hold water?

    So how do you bucketize rec vs competitive, and all the things in between, without using the cost of being competitive as the only delineation.

    ... and Sue, thank you too. You never know when information like that will come in handy.

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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    I'm all for indie empowerment and DIY.

    I think maybe there just needs to be a more solid middle tier where people involved in music can make a living at it.

    And maybe there is one if we look hard enough.

    Or maybe it's another Big Foot sighting.





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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    Interesting thoughts nobby. Thanks for taking the time to put that out there. Since landing here, I've struggled with my thoughts around the pros and cons of lowering the barrier to entry. In and outside the scope of music. Much of it came from my slightly fucked up upbringing, being told "no" and "you can't do it that way" a lot. I developed this feeling(overcompensation) of benign charged with enabling anyone who wanted a shot at something. I still feel that way, but I've started to see where it can cause problems.

    My oldest (7) loves playing soccer and works hard at it. Unfortunately he got more of his moms coordination and less of mine(not bragging, just fact). So next year they split into Recreational and Competitive divisions and he's only got one choice ... rec. He'll still have fun, but the understanding of what we're in for is clear. And if by some miracle he develops an ability beyond rec, he can go try out for the competitive team.

    This made me think about how that could that correlate to the music industry. Maybe that's what the Major/Indie/No Label ranks should do? The breakdown in my mind is this though. In the soccer example, my son's game isn't going to be pushed out there as the premier game of the weekend. In fact, outside of the kids and parents, it's not going to be out there at all. The local high school game may get some buzz around town, the Colorado Rapids game will get some more buzz around the state and nationally maybe. But the Arsenal v Tottenham, or US v Mexico (ugh) game will get national and international attention. There's a pretty clear and well formed pecking order for soccer leagues.

    In music, everyone can jam their son's rec game up my ass and trying to act like it's something special. There's no real filter for me to apply.
    On the other hand, if I try to apply the "major label music" filter, they are trying to shove some pop country garbage up my ass and expecting me to believe it's worth paying a premium for.
    In my mind the major label music filter is failing it's job of presenting only top tier music ... forcing people back into the muck to see if they can catch a compelling soccer game elsewhere and becoming increasingly disillusioned.
    Does that thought hold water?

    So how do you bucketize rec vs competitive, and all the things in between, without using the cost of being competitive as the only delineation.

    ... and Sue, thank you too. You never know when information like that will come in handy.

    -r
    Everything's "rec" if you can't get paid for it. And these days you get paid according to your looks, not what you play.

    I'm waiting for grumpy looking old fat men who look like they have an attitude problem to come into vogue...
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    Right now I'm wondering if Captain Casino posted that article just to see if he could get my head to explode
    I didn't , but I actually agree with a lot of what you're saying. I think when I read the article I took it from the point of view of the author as intimating these were all bad things.

    I don't know about the information-starved model of making people wait for you. There's certainly a timing component to that, but fans now seem to need at least a slow and regular leak in order to stay attentive. Maybe. I don't think that's a good thing, either. But I have seen clients and friends worry themselves into never promoting their record at all because they think they HAVE to be involved with social media as a way to gauge their 'success' level that day. It becomes paralyzing. And that's poisonous to the artist. But it's like... what choice do you have?

    I took off from any type of social media around the same time I discovered this place. I've come to terms with the fact that I'll have to engage in it in some way, shape, or form if I want to further my own efforts in recording/musicland. Not sure it's worth it. I quite enjoy what small amount of psychological health I have left!

    p.s. stealing captain casino for when I evolve. and comrade casino for when we eventually get taken over by the russians.
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    Default Re: Is Social Media Bad for Musician's Psychological Health?

    If we are sold off to the Saudis you can call me Abu Nobby
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    Never underestimate the amount of contempt a failed musician has for those of us who are still trying.
    If the party's good enough, you can actually suck to a remarkable degree.

    Greedle

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