Thread: Sound check etiquette

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  1. #1
    Martini Drinker Van Morrison's enunciation coach
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    Default Sound check etiquette

    Hello all

    I'd posted this elsewhere a while ago and Pounce had posted an excellent reply.
    Hoping this is helpful info.

    Meet the soundcheck veteran. I’ve been gigging a lot these last two years after a break of about five years from the road. The joy of playing live is what makes it all worthwile. It is the true reward of the musician to be allowed to perform your tunes to an audience. You write by yourself, you record and rehearse by yourself or with your bandmates. The gig is basically the step up from masturbation to sex. I am a sideman in these gigs (guitar and bvoxes), which I actually quite enjoy for a change, being able to serve the tunes and look at the whole thing with a broader perspective without the pressure the main artist has.
    Let me set the stage for you : the artist is one of my best friends, he has released 6 or 7 albums (3 on a major label, the rest - as his latest we’re promoting now - on indies or his own with distribution through a major).
    We draw about 500 people to the average gig, but with summer coming up we’re playing big festivals with crowds up to 10000. When we play out, we bring our own FOH engineer and one “backliner/stage hand” who is also our “road manager” – fancy but deserved title for a fantastic guy completely devoted to helping us out as much as humanly possible. We can’t yet afford drums and guitar techs, neither do we have our own monitors and light people. We send out a “required PA” sheet, and suggest a PA company to the promoter. We headline a lot of mini-festivals with three or four bands playing, but we still only get to play with the same PA about every other gig. All this so you get the idea of the level we are at, and I am guessing this is the average for quite a few pro or semi-pro musicians out there.

    So anyway : back to the soundcheck : long gone is the mystique or glamour of doing a soundcheck. It’s just something you have to go through if you want the concert to be an enjoyable experience. Which brings us to the priorities of the soundcheck :

    - priority number 1 : getting a great FOH sound (FOH = front of house, the mix through the main speakers for the audience if you prefer). If the FOH sound sucks, you can play your best gig and it will still be a bad gig.

    - priority number 2 : getting a great stage sound in the monitors. If the performers can hear themselves comfortably, they’re likely to give a better performance. However, this is still pointless if priority 1 isn’t achieved.

    - priority number 3 : if a compromise needs to be reached for lack of time or lack of equipment (such as not enough monitor mixes/busses), the main artist or the front man/woman gets priority. Yeah, I know, this sucks donkey balls. Get a helmet. As far as I know, most of the audience isn’t coming to see ME but my friend with the name on the poster. Get your ego in check. However, this is still pointless if priority 1 isn’t achieved.

    - priority number 4 : make it an enjoyable experience for everyone involved. Meaning, can we achieve priorities 1, 2 and 3 without being assholes to FOH and monitors people, light people, promoters, stage hands, etc ? I played a gig just last night where we weren’t headlining, and the headlining star act were complete assholes to the crew, they’re a bunch of has-beens riding a recent revival wave, enacting their past fame and so-called r n’ r cred by treating everyone like dogshit, then coming on stage all gakked up like it’s a normal thing to do. A pathetic bunch, really. Anyway, our friendly and cooperative attitude with the sound and light crowd ensured we got better treatment. It’s not very cool to walk on stage, and the first thing you tell the monitors guy is : “this is the worst sound I’ve ever had”. Usually, people tend to NOT want to help you after these kinds of comments. In comparison, common courtesy HELPS A LOT. Here are some hints to try to achieve priorities 1 to 4…

    - be on time. Even if it means YOU are going to have to WAIT. Keith Richards (or was it Charlie Watts ?) once said something like “40 years of Rolling Stones…5 years of action and 35 years waiting”. So you think you’re better than the Stones ?

    - introduce yourself to the crew. “Hi, I’m Goes211, and I play guitar and sing bvoxes, how are you ? Oh, excuse me, what is your name ?”

    - check what the dudes are busy with : there's no point insetting up your amps or drums if they haven’t finished setting up the PA yet. You’ll just make yourself a nuisance. Ask before you start lugging. Better for your back, and cooler for the crew. If in doubt, just ask : “hey guys, no rush or pressure, but any idea when you’ll be needing us to set up ?”

    - setup is NOT the time to think of a new stage plot for the band. “Tried and tested” usually works best. you’re just asking for trouble if the keyboard player isn’t used to having the guitar player and his Marshall stack next to him. If you tell the PA guy “the bass goes there” (assuming you haven’t sent them a stage plot/layout plan before hand), it’s just going to be a hassle for him to change the lines and pull them across the stage if your change your mind. Most of the time, the PA people (I’m not talking about the engineers, I’m talking about the guys who lug the equipment and set it up on the stage, pull the lines, etc…) do an incredibly HARD job. They are here BEFORE we arrive and they leave long AFTER we’ve left the building. Be nice and show some respect. If they don’t show up, there’s no gig. And there is NO glory, autographs, glamour or groupies to be had for them.

    - set up your equipment in a PRO way : no dangling cords. Make sure you have pro quality and long enough cords. Gaffer tape down everything that can be tripped on…

    - The soundcheck is a COOPERATIVE effort to help out all the parties involved in getting the SOUND right to achieve their goal. SOUND. Does it say LIGHTcheck ? I didn’t think so. Light people, please avoid toying with your vari-lites while the band is setting up their equipment or simply trying to get through the soundcheck without killing each other or the monitors guy… Just give us some steady, non-flickering white or yellow lighting during soundcheck. You can have all the fun you want during the gig, and the audience will revel in your psychedelic endeavours. Hell, for all I now you’re going to make us look good. But for now, we’d like to NOT have to struggle just seeing the monitors and FOH people we are busy working with.

    - stage levels : all bands ought to try to achieve what’s referred to as the elusive “natural balance” or “comfort zone” on stage where everyone hears himself (and the others) so he can perform best. Forget all the other rules and tatoo this one on your fat arm with a branding iron : TURN. IT. DOWN. Just ask the FOH and monitors guys, they’ll gladly carve it on your forehead with a tom-tom fork. How many of us can justify Jimi Hendrix levels ? I still remember the Woodstock movie (of course, that was before the days of the monitor mix) where Jimi’s band is playing, and they have a guy playing –cough…cough… - percussions… the poor sod is banging his bongos like there’s no tomorrow but all you can hear is the hum of the Marshalls… pathetic fucker… Today, playing too loud means EVERYONE needs to crank their volume and monitors up and it turns into an escalation. Time to introduce what is a bit of a mystery to me : most PA’s used to have “side monitors”. The “sides” were placed (duh !) on each side of the stage, facing the band, and they usually had some kind of general mix of the whole band. Which meant that if you had a basic mix of yourself in your own monitor and the “sides mix”, you could pretty much do ok. But most PA’s we run into don’t seem to have sides anymore these days…which means I need to ask a bit of everything else in my monitors, and myself louder if I want to be in the comfort zone. And I become part of the escalation race. What that means is that all the mics start to pick up A LOT more volume and the monitors and FOH people end up with a feedback accident waiting to happen. In such a situation, look at your tattoo : TURN. IT. DOWN.

    - During soundcheck : be available for the FOH and monitors engineers : once soundcheck has started, this should be your ONLY preoccupation. WAIT for your fucking turn ! Soundcheck usually starts with the drums. Typically, the FOH engineer will ask for Kick, Snare, Toms, Hats, Overheads, pad/samplers, etc…separately and then together. Wait for the engineer’s instructions. If he needs you to hit the floor tom for an extra minute it’s because he’s trying to fix a problem likely coming from YOUR drums, you moron ! Hit the fucking floor tom and STFU. Then bass, then bass and drums. Then guitars or keys, then voxes. DO NOT PLAY when it is not your turn. You are being an ASSHOLE if you play when not asked. You are also being an asshole if you DON’T PLAY when asked. Open your fucking ears and LISTEN to what these people are asking ! If you are a guitar or keyboard player. : tell the FOH guy you are going to give him your loudest sound first so he can set his levels. Then proceed to do so and DO NOT change your levels without first warning both FOH and monitors.

    - Which brings me to : soundcheck mystery number 2 : it still routinely happens that the FOH and/or monitors engineers DON’T plug in a mic to communicate with the band on stage. What this means is a deaf and dumb dialogue where nobody hears each other and EVERYBODY is frustrated – this includes bad communication between the FOH and monitors, which usually includes some patching mistakes between stage and FOH. Our drummer (well, he is a drummer, right) still has not understood that if he’s not talking INTO a fucking mic, our FOH guy 50 yards away will NOT hear him. It’s a running joke for us now and we place bets on the time before he realizes. A good and efficient soundcheck should be 1. the FOH engineer opens some vocals mics so the band can communicate with him. 2. He asks if everybody can hear him (this might mean a designated band member to communicate with him). Then he goes through every instrument. 3. In the meantime, the monitors guy gets a rough mix for every instrument. 4. the band plays a tune together for FOH adjustments 5. We stop and each musician gets to ask the monitor guys some corrections. 6. Some instruments may need to play separately for final FOH adjustments. 7. End the soundcheck with the first tune of your set. That will avoid you starting with a “surprise tune” for the FOH guy.

    - BTW : there’s no point in questioning what the FOH guy does because YOU CAN NOT JUDGE HIS WORK FROM THE STAGE. Don’t trust your friends, they don’t know shit. Don’t trust your girlfriend or wife, there’s never enough of your guitar in the mix for her. But if many people come to you after a gig to tell you it was too loud or that the sound was terrible, that’s a hint.
    It's also a good idea to thank everyone before you leave. You'll hopefully be working with these people again. It costs you nothing, and makes everybody feel better.

    Ultimately, the sound check’s purpose is to make everybody’s experience of the gig a good and memorable one. Generally, it’s ok to be demanding and to have a desire for perfection. In real gig life, the average sound check lasts about 30 minutes (if you play festivals, all you get is a "line-check" - which means testing all the lines and mics work, and then you're off). So you just might have to make do with an “average” situation which may be improved upon during the gig if everyone (FOH, monitors AND musicians) pays attention to each other. We always ask the monitor guys to watch us during the couple first tunes. It’s amazing that they often IGNORE that. Remember the first lie of rock n' roll : "it'll sound better with the crowd". Oh well. Here I am. Fucking former Jr. Rebel playing Mr. Givalesson. Still, I’m sure I’ve forgotten many points. Please chime in. Coolio

    Originally Posted by Pounce
    live sound engineers obviously want to make bands sound good 100% of the time, and are usually working shitty long hous and are not frequently thanked for thier work.

    if you are a band, be on time. that's part of the gig. find out when the space opens, when crew are there to receive you (ie: when are you expected), and who you are to talk to.

    talk to the right people. the foh guy doesn't care about "the door" and the manager of the club doesn't usually know how many compressors you have.

    make friends with everybody. here's two words to practive using.. please or thank you. give that a try.

    have a stage plot, input list, and tech rider as well as a hospitality rider and a contract. if you don't know what these are yet you have some homework to do. again, with respect to these, have them current and correct. and ask the right people questions about their respective roles in fulfilling these riders and contracts. and that please and thank you thing.

    imho, i want to get a stage monitor situation happening first as the stage volume will affect how i mix the foh. and the onstage mix(es) will affect the bands performance, so i address it first. the foh mix will happen later, and will change with an audience in the room as well. so that's for the foh guy to worry about during the show.

    talking to the foh guy politely (and by name since you've introduced yourself, thanked him profusely, and know his favorite drink) and get a monitor mix that is agreeable to the whole band.

    do not send a girlfriend to "help" with a mix

    don't hurt the gear onstage or act like some sort of prima donna. that will NOT get the foh guy in the mood to help you to sound any better.

    if there is any critical gear for "your original sound", then bring it with you or make sure it's there in your technical rider. and then call and confirm again that it's really there and working and that there aren't unnaceptable substitutions.

    bring extra stuff, like spare picks, sticks, cables, etc.

    have GAFF tape and not duct tape. if you put duct tape on MY cables you will leave with a new asshole.

    you might want to provide a cd of your band to the venue when booking the show so that the sound guy can hear what you think a mix of your material should sound like. he can then bear that in mind when mixing the live show. i always think the mix of a band live should be similar to the mix on a cd, even when the performances or arrangements are modified for the live show. that's cool, improvisation and all, but the mix from the cd is probably a great starting point for the live sound engineer.

    here's my "trick" when setting monitor levels -

    first, i check the channels the same way every engineer does. and i start with drums. like everyone does. drums are always the lowest numbered channels on my board and i work my way up. (and i DO have a talkback mic on). so after i have something like the kick in the house and routed properly with compression and whatnot, i ask each bandmember who wants that sound in their monitor to raise their hand. (related to how many monitor mixes there are). i say leave your hand up if you want this sound in your monitor, and lower your hand when it is loud enough. i then send that sound out on enough auxes to cover all band members. (i do this when there are more mixes, like more than four or five). then go instrument by instrument and repeat until each mix has at least all of the elements needed at each monitor position. then when the whole band plays, we tweak the volumes, but the band has already technically chosen what is in each wedge and at what volume, so we have a good start. as you tweak from here, you can cue up each monitor mix and hear what you are sending them so it's easier to see what they are looking for.

    after those monitor levels are set, you can work on foh. it will be different with an audience, but you get all the routing sussed out. done right, the band is happy, monitor level setting has went quickly, and you can worry about making it sound kick ass. should be relatively easy at this point.

    but for getting the monitor levels set, having the band be polite, on time, not play or talk all at once, etc. is important. and why do folks who scream their vocals always whisper into mics during soundchecks? answer - they are clueless assholes.

    i think i'm just rambling now, i'm at work on a break.
    Last edited by Goes211; January 15th, 2010 at 11:04 PM.
  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    Clap, calp, calp. Super job.

    I can say the being nice to the crew really does help. Last year we got invited to be part of a two day street festival. We sent them a stage plot and input list, nothing fancy, just what we need. One thing we listed is that I use in ear monitors, they can skip the wedge and just run a line over by be me, XLR male or female, 1/4, it didn't matter, I could work with it.

    Of course like most things the people running the business end of things only passed on the stage plots and requirements to the sound guys a few days before the show. So I'm on the phone with the head techie, someone that I've done business with on and off over many years. "So, yea, is the in ear feed going to be a problem?" "You need what? I don't know, first I heard about this, let me give you the number of Joe, the guy in charge of the sound for both stages."

    I call Joe, explain who I am and who sent me and why. He said, shouldn't be a problem, look him as soon as we get to the festival.

    Day of the gig, get on site, look up Joe, he's real cool about things, he walks me over to the monitor guy, and the stage manager. We all talk a few minutes.

    At the end of our set, we got of quick and we all thanked the crew, they really we very nice to us. Friends tolds us we sounded top notch, so we pasted that on.

    This festival doesn't like to repeat acts from year to year, but we were back again this summer. The reason why, Joe and the stage manager told the bookers for the event that we were the best, and they had to have us back. Joe was even working the other stage this year, but he made it a point to come find me, introduce me to the guy runing FOH for our stage before I even had a chance to get that far.

    Guess what, it went off like clockwork. We had fun, the crowd was grooving to the music, and the crew all had smiles on their faces when we finished.

    Everyone wins.
  3. #3
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    Absolutely Fantastic.

    Another point I'd like to re-emphasize is that musicians, no offense, but SOUNDCHECK IS NOT A REHEARSAL.

    You see, you know your music. Or if you don't, well you shouldn't be on a stage doing soundcheck, should you?

    Sound check is the time for the audio crew to get to know what it is that you do. Its the time when they find out whether your drummer is a bronx street basher or a pussy. Its the time when, in the space of a few minutes, the audio crew has a chance to figure out whether you're going to make the show mix hard work or easy as pie.

    If you have a player who is filling in or doesn't know his parts, mention to the audio guys before sound check starts that you have to, at some point, work through some changes.

    What that does is put an interrupt in their minds to make sure to leave some time for you.

    At that point, if the day hasn't been a clusterfuck, they'll probably burn through soundcheck in an organized manner, have you play a "representative" song, and then leave you to your devices for 15 or 20 minutes. Again, thats if time allows.

    Now the term "representative" song was used on purpose. By representative, I don't mean the quite accoustic song where the drummer's using brushes and all the vocalists are doing sensitive whispers. I mean the song in your set where you're playing in a manner that is representative of your entire set. Or hell...that song where you're going to be GIVING it. Remember...you know your song and set. The audio guys don't. You need to give them the benefit of hearing your "worst case" so they can prepare for it.

    Whew...this started to be a one liner and turned into more...

    ..next up...what goes on inside the mobile during soundcheck...



    Cheers,
    Click.
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    i'll have more to add soon, but the obvious thrust of this thread and this situation in real life is that the relationship between the band and the soundguys is symbiotic. everyone wants to do a good job, and everyone wants it to sound right. no doubt about it. there are a few things that both the band and the soundguy can do to ensure that the band sounds right. in thinking about this from an objective point of view, you'd think it would be obvious that everyone would want to work as a team trying to get things right. otoh, in reality, some talent treats the tech crew like dirt or treats them well but doesn't know how to communicate what they want or need until it's too late. in those situations, it's unlikely that the talent will sound their best. what i know now that i didn't know back when i was in a band and gigging bars is what i needed to do those shows. i didn't know how, when, or what to say to the soundman. in retrospect, i now know what i should have communicated to them. so these posts are an attempt to get this information out there to folks who can have better sounding shows by figuring out and communicating their tech needs.
  5. #5
    A Top 10 Beaver Licker Grumpy young man
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    Fantastic. Though I do less and less FOH these days, this document so far covers everything I would say and more.
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    This is something every musician show know....Nice job guys...
    Peace,

    Jerryskid

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  7. #7
    Once did Lady Di on a bet Happy Roman... Gladiator
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    I try to spend at least some time teaching my students how to soundcheck. Do what the engineer says, and hit 'em like you're fixin' to when you play the songs.

    I have a couple rules I'd like to propose:

    Line check first, monitor levels second. I don't know if I need more floor tom yet.

    Do everyone's monitors at once: kik--everyone raise your hand until you have enough kik, and so on.
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  8. #8
    goes looking for thin ice to walk on You ain't a beauty but hey you're alright.
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    This is very good info. Info I wish I'd had before my first "band" performance - ( where I was percieved as a large asshole).

    I have several questions about live performance situations, but they have to do with equipment needs mostly.

    Tons of experiance here at the Live Womb.
    I'll be watching.
    SV
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    I have several questions about live performance situations, but they have to do with equipment needs mostly.
    Well, OK, Start a new thread, post the questions.

    A co-worker is just get a band started and yesterday started asking me a few real simple questions along the same lines.

    Some how he got it in his head that wireless mics, even if he might only want to walk around with the mic for one song, would be a super idea. Both myself and another woman that does a lot of solo singing told him to forget the idea.
  10. #10
    wardrobe malfunction investigator 329 M/S Hen=Mock Chicken!
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    Some how he got it in his head that wireless mics, even if he might only want to walk around with the mic for one song, would be a super idea. Both myself and another woman that does a lot of solo singing told him to forget the idea.
    what is your concern about wireless mics? I have used them a lot with different singers and it work great.

    you just have to get real ones. not the cheep shit Twisted
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    well, i use them all the time as well.

    but really good mics and frequency agile uhf systems for sure. anything less than that is asking for trouble. i suspect what spock is getting at is that if there is no real NEED to be wireless, then skip the batteries and the possibility that there will be sound degradation or problems with the wireless transmission. just keep a wire in there and you eliminate a whole lot of variables. generally speaking, i want to have as few possible points of failure in a live setup as possible.

    it makes me think of those horrible business theater events for which i run sound all of the time. they always insist on lavalier mics, and then they just stand behind the podium anyway. fucking idiots. yes, lavs sound worse and have a possibility of having the wireless signal go funny instead of the nice wired small condenser that is right in front of them anyway. sheer stupidity.

    wireless can be ok, but do it right and know that you need it. otherwise, i will always recommend wired connections instead. at least when i'm involved in touring broadway it is done right. nice sennheiser systems which are great, new pro cell batteries for every show, the packs wrapped in unlubricated condoms to keep out any sweat, backup units, etc. freaking great. on that level you can do wireless great. dpa or countryman mics on all of that and your system is sweet. but less than that and you are starting to gamble. i guess if you've seen wireless fail on a show, watched fucking talent turn off their mics accidently and look at you like you did it, had a battery die, had rf interference, etc. you get more cautious around wireless as people should well be.
  12. #12
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    That's great Goes. That list should be supplied to the band at gunpoint.

    TURN. IT. DOWN. Just ask the FOH and monitors guys, they’ll gladly carve it on your forehead with a tom-tom fork.

    That's the number one reason I gave up FOH. The day I realized that my urge to swap the paycheck for a 12" gauge actually could render me 12 to life - I quit.
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    what is your concern about wireless mics? I have used them a lot with different singers and it work great.

    you just have to get real ones. not the cheep shit Twisted
    Well pounce said it. But yes, unless you get some real good stuff, its just not worth it. This guy is going to playing the same size or smaller places then my group has been playing. He's a guitarist, but thinks he has a song or two when he is not playing and then wants to move around. He just isn't going to have any place to move, and even if he does than a XLR cable of 50' would be more than he would ever need.

    He said to me "I got to move man, come on Elvis moved."

    I answered, "So Elvis had a mic cable and it didn't slow him down one bit. Are you saying your are better than Elvis?"

    If he wants to waste his money, then OK he can buy the high end wireless systems. But considering that he is just getting a band started it would be a waste of money that he could put to something else that wil make a difference.

    I've had a few times where I was upfront, not behind the keyboards. I hold the mic in my right hand, and I need something for my left to do. I like to hold the cable.
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    what is your concern about wireless mics? I have used them a lot with different singers and it work great.

    you just have to get real ones. not the cheep shit Twisted
    If there's no driving reason to go wireless, then don't. A mic and cable is simple and dependable; don't make things more complicated than they have to be. God knows that even in the simplest live setup, there are far too many things that can go wrong.

    I was playing a gig with a lead singer who used a wireless mic, and when he left the stage while the rest of us played an instrumental number, he had the bright idea to turn off his mic to save his batteries. In the club next door, there was a guitarist who was wireless on the same frequency. Wanna guess what happened? It might have been OK had he been playing the same song as we were, I guess... ;^)
    Gordon in Austin

    Go ahead, squeeze the wheeze; it doesn't hurt me.
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    The other day I was running a show with 4 or 5 Bands. We had 5 wireless Microphones because one act had 5 singers who where running around the stage and dancing while thez where singing. So cable was out of Question. I was using the same Mics for the other acts too. This was the very first time I gave the bass player and guitar player wireless mics. I used Shure SLX systems which work flawless.

    What I really liked on this situation: there where less Cable on Stage where you could fall over and the stage looked much more cleaned up. Changes between acts worked faster and everyone was happy.
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    This should be handed out to every band member as they get on the bus, then read out loud for those that don't read. I think it would clear up 3/4 of all problems with sound checks, and everyone would get along better. This is almost as important as the biggest rule of touring...."no crapping on the bus"
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    This is almost as important as the biggest rule of touring...."no crapping on the bus"
    LOL...And man...you DO NOT want to suffer the punishment for violating said rule...
  18. #18
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    That should be force fed to everyone ever thinking about coming within 20 feet of a microphone...AND their relatives/friends/significant others.

    As for wireless, if you've got a selection of top end gear, go for it, it makes life a LOT easier on festivals and vocal-intensive shows.

    But if Joe Local turns up with his £50 radio shack special, you can guarantee he'll be on a wired SM58 for the show if I've got anything to do with it. "Sorry mate, I'm not getting any signal from your receiver. Looks like it'll have to be a real wired mic for today, sorry..."

    That's the problem - they think "it's wireless, therefore it's better". Even if the frequency response of said mic looks like the himalayas. "Sure you can use yoru shiny new radio shack wireless mic if you'd like to hear a selection of non-musical sine waves coming out of your monitor every few seconds!"

    Rant over.
    I'm probably talking shit.

    "Mixing most 'heavy' records is like trying to find order and lucidity in a recording of a Cathedral Pipe Organ, all stops out, randomly veering between Handel's Messiah, Ginestera's 2nd and a coupla Bach Fugues, in a Titanium kitchenware foundry, while a gaggle of enraged PCP snorting gorillas with bullhorns conduct a demolition derby with cement mixers against the soothing cacophony of a nearby landslide/tsunami/heavy artillery exchange."- Slipperman
  19. #19
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    Related to the other thread about wireless mics.

    At festival we did last year, we were the second last act of the night. The last act did 50s stuff, "Jerry and the Greasers", (not the real name, but you get the idea). I've run into them before, Jerry has a real attitude. We got off the stage in record time, their drummer forgot his cymbals, and ended up slipping a few bucks to our drummer to use his. Jerry insisted on using his wireless mic. They were 10 minutes late starting, and his mic crapped out on the first song.
  20. #20
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    Default Re: Sound check etiquette

    - The soundcheck is a COOPERATIVE effort to help out all the parties involved in getting the SOUND right to achieve their goal. SOUND. Does it say LIGHTcheck ? I didn’t think so. Light people, please avoid toying with your vari-lites while the band is setting up their equipment or simply trying to get through the soundcheck without killing each other or the monitors guy… Just give us some steady, non-flickering white or yellow lighting during soundcheck. You can have all the fun you want during the gig, and the audience will revel in your psychedelic endeavours. Hell, for all I now you’re going to make us look good. But for now, we’d like to NOT have to struggle just seeing the monitors and FOH people we are busy working with.


    OK, while I do appriciate where this is coming from, if I have 4 hours of programing to do in 1 hour, I've gotta do it. Please do understand that moving lights are not plug and play like a par rig. They take time to program, and promoters and producers never seem to take that into acount. Some degree of programing can be done ahead of time, IF I know enough about the gig, but more often than not that is simply not possible. I will always do my best to give you enough light to see by, but sometimes some programing just has to happen. Believe me, I'm working too, not toying around.

    And while were at it, if sound guys could stop blowing 1k tone at 140 dB SPL through their rigs when I'm dangling from a truss and 6 feet in front of the mains, I'd sure appriciate it.


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